Rave Reviews for Vertical Influences!

Rave Reviews for Vertical Influences!

The cast of Vertical Influences take a bow! Photo Credit: Roaming the Planet

The Cultch celebrated the opening of a very special show on April 18. Montreal’s Le Patin Libre brought down Britannia Ice Rink with an unprecedented performance – unlike any ice dancing you are likely to have seen! No sparkles, no fuzzy costumes, just pure and beautiful skating!

Check out some of these AMAZING REVIEWS for Vertical Influences:

“Do your body a favour: GO SEE Vertical Influences” – Colin Thomas

“In Vertical Influences, we get five young dancers on skates, wearing ponytails, dreads, and baggy street clothes, VIRTUOSICALLY reinventing the form and PLAYFULLY using it to upend notions of time, space, and physics. With equal amounts of sass and technique, THEY TEAR UP THE SHEET OF ICE” – Janet Smith, The Georgia Straight

Vertical Influences is a STUNNING combination of figure skating and dance” – Mark Robins, Vancouver Presents

Vertical Influences is a BEAUTIFUL MASH-UP of sophisticated figure skating with contemporary street dance” – Carly Whetter, Vancouver Magazine

“Five Performers…DAZZLED us with straight ice skating with no tu-tus, or schmaltzy music” – Alex Waterhouse Hayward

VERTICAL INFLUENCES runs at Britannia Ice Rink, April 18-30. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

How to Be: Q&A with Choreographer Tara Cheyenne Friedenberg

How to Be: Q&A with Choreographer Tara Cheyenne Friedenberg

How To Be, a new creation by Vancouver’s iconic dance & theatre creator Tara Cheyenne Friedenberg, opens April 12 at The Cultch Historic Theatre! Produced by Tara Cheyenne Performance, this piece was presented as part of Boca Del Lupo’s Micro Performance Series and at Dancing on the Edge. We are excited about its premiere at The Cultch! We had a chance to ask Tara a few questions and learn more about the inspiration for How To Be:    

 

L to R: (top row) Kimberly Stevenson, Tara Cheyenne, Josh Martin, Bevin Poole, (bottom row) Marcus Youssef, Kate Franklin. Photo by Wendy D

Hi Tara! We’re thrilled that your piece, How To Be, will be premiering at The Historic Theatre April 12-15. The image for the show expresses a dynamic relationship between the performers – what is the relationship between them?  The photos were a riff on bad family portraits. Family often being the first place we learn “how to be” for better or worse. We are playing with the relationship between how we feel about ourselves and how we feel about others. It’s a great quagmire of heartbreak and comedy.

Does this piece contain your signature comedic style? What are some of those comedic elements? Well I think it’s funny! The performers/collaborators are all extremely talented and funny people. They each bring hilarity and vulnerability as we track “how to be.” Comic elements? I think it’s possible to find comedy everywhere; our pain, our loneliness, our egos run amuck. Certainly our endless cultural obsession with defining the correct ways to be is absorbing and funny.

What inspires you about exploring the topic of “how to be”? My own futile desire to find the right way to be. And of course as I’ve explored this I find we are all wrestling with the question, and frustrated with ourselves for not knowing the answers. Of course there are no answers. What does it even mean to “be yourself”?

The show seems to explore a fine line between fragility and persona – can you talk more about this? We are all uniquely ourselves, one in the universe and composites of every personality and experience that has touched us. Asking the question “how should a person be?” opens us up to our own vulnerability, our own fragile tentative fumbling. Where does my persona begin? Where does the “self” end? Can I find the answers in a Facebook questionnaire? What does my answer to number 7 really say about me?

If we fail at how we think we should be, what’s left? I think we fail all the time at this. Our emotions, our bodies, our minds betray our ideas of how/what we should be all the time. But isn’t  that wonderful? Fascinating and infuriating? Failure is possibility.

How to Be runs from April 12-15 in The Historic Theatre. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Vertical Influences comes to Britannia Ice Rink April 18-30

Vertical Influences comes to Britannia Ice Rink April 18-30

After a sold-out European tour the award-winning Canadian ice dance group Le Patin Libre makes their debut in Vancouver. From Apr 18-30 they will be performing their unique show Vertical Influences at Britannia Ice Rink (1661 Parker St) – Don’t miss your chance to see them!

Vertical Influences has been getting amazing reviews all across Europe

“It is JOYFUL, uplifting, creative, and inspiring.” The Age

“Liberating, EXHILARATING, breathtaking” – The Stage

“One of those rare shows I could willingly have sat through all over again…A PURE BODY RUSH. Astounding ★★★★★” — The Guardian (UK)

Check out this great video showing the “Making of ‘Vertical Influences’.

Vertical Influences has been described as a form of “contemporary dance on ice”.  Rising stars Le Patin Libre, a fresh and inventive group of former championship skaters, are creating a new kind of ice dancing, far beyond the confines of traditional figure skating. Electronic beats, melodic lyricism, and refreshing dance moves mean maximum fun for the whole family!

Vertical Influences runs from April 18-30, 2017 at Britannia Ice Rink. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Not Your Average Dance Show: All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey

Not Your Average Dance Show: All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey

Photo credit: Grouped’ArtGravelArtGroup

Photo credit: Grouped’ArtGravelArtGroup

If you come to see All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey, be prepared to leave with lots to think about. This is not your average dance show. When it played in Ottawa, the Globe and Mail reported that, “Audience members lingered so long in the theatre, discussing the work that the… ushers, who wanted to lockup, had to ask them to leave.”

Created by Frédérick Gravel, All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey is a tale of distraught men, the ordinary run-of-the-mill North American male – beer, T-shirts, baseball caps, cowboy boots, beer bellies and their hesitations, outbursts of violence, confusion, brusque changes of mood, right left, front and back, lurching in a drunken haze of beer and powerlessness.

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Frédérick Gravel has been active in the Montreal scene for over 10 years and graduated from the dance faculty of Université du Québec à Montréal in 2009. An interdisciplinary artist with experience as a choreographer, dancer, musician and a lighting designer; it is no surprise that Frédérick Gravel’s work embraces a mixture of styles and disciplines. He has become known for pushing the boundaries of dance choreography and turning it on its head. Says the Ottawa Citizen, “Gravel’s work dances the fine line between rock concert, trailer park party and dance performance. He certainly likes to push the boundaries of what dance can be – taking pleasure in obliterating stereotypes.”

Merging rock music and performance art into his dance performance, Frédérick Gravel’s work is emotionally gripping and hard hitting.  All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey is described as being part dance, part performance art, and part rock show. Be prepared to leave this show feeling as though you have just experienced a particularly exhilarating rock concert.

les-bonobos

But don’t be scared away.  Just because All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey deals with some heavy things, doesn’t mean it isn’t accessible. In fact it is known for skirting the line between the serious and the comic. This is dark comedy at its best. In an interview with The Dance Current Philip Szporer says, “Gravel has good patter… with wicked timing. He doesn’t hesitate to reinforce, constantly, the idea that contemporary dance is “waaay” too serious, and why not have a good laugh?”

Check out the trailer.

All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey runs Nov 8 – 12, 2016 in the Historic Theatre. Tickets from $20 are available online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363

The Best of Now: Gearing up for the Canadian premiere!

This is an exciting time here at The Cultch as we gear up for the Canadian premiere of The Best of Now by the Northwest Dance Project (Portland, Oregon) which opens on March 6! Touted as “one of the hottest dance companies in America”by Portland Stage Review, the company is ready to set the stage on fire with brand new works by Northwest Dance Project’s founder/artistic director Sarah Slipper, Chinese-born, Canadian based choreographer Wen Wei Wang, and the talented Danielle Agami!

Here’s a sneak peek at the project:

CHI choreographed by Wen Wei Wang

chi-blog

CHI photo taken by Blaine Truitt Covert

This dance piece is all about energy, which is not surprising given the title. The show features nine fabulous dancers who move to Giorgio Magnanensi’s melodically restless score. The show moves like a movie as it draws from martial art and kung fu films.

Throughout, the dancers turn movements that traditional ballet might consider inelegant into moments of odd beauty: shoulder-tilts and torso-turns that emphasize the sheer physicality rather than the metaphoric possibilities of the human form. Dance is often at its best when its “meaning” is simply what it is: a particular movement through time and space, like the sound waves of music.

MEMORYHOUSE choreographed by Sarah Slipper

memory-house-blog

Memoryhouse photo taken by Blaine Truitt Covert

The second part of the show features Franco Nieto and Andrea Parson, both winners of the Princess Grace Award, respectively 2012 and 2010. This award is one of the highest individual recognitions for dancers and for a single small company to have two winners in three years is phenomenal!

MemoryHouse is a passion drama that features Parson in an apron strewing flour on the stage, and the pair grappling sweetly, erotically and then violently in movement that literally climbs through windows to continue outside the space. Slipper’s twisting lifts are stunners, and the frisson between Parson and Nieto reveals they can act as well as dance.
On top of that, the musical background by Max Richter and Yann Tiersen is fantastic.
Yann Tiersen is a French musician who worked on a lot of film music such as Amelie and Goodbye Lenin.

This Time Tomorrow choreographed by Danielle Agami

this-time-tomorrow-blog

This Time Tomorrow photo taken by Blaine Truitt Covert

The final piece of the night features the full company of dancers and explores the delightfully unique. A practitioner of the Israeli Gaga technique, choreographer Danielle Agami works to disconnect the mind from the body to create organic movement that pushes the limits of “normal”!

This delightfully absurd piece features music from indie rock bands such as Puerto Muerto. Be prepared to see it all: collision, grinding, jiving, wiggling, and even maybe an orange or two.

The Best of Now by Northwest Dance Project runs at The Cultch from March 6- 8 at the Historic Theatre. Tickets are from $18 and can be purchased online, or by calling the box office at 604.251.1363.

Insights from the creative minds behind ‘Me So You So Me’: Tiffany Tregarthen & David Raymond

The Cultch is happy to be presenting the unique dance piece Me So You So Me by Out Innerspace until Mar 1, 2014.

Want to learn more about the creative process and influences behind the show? Check out the interview with creators Tiffany Tregarthen and David Raymond below!

I understand that Me So You So Me was highly influenced by the music of the renowned percussionist Asa Chang from Japan. Could you tell us how you discovered his work, and how it came to influence your dance piece?

We first were introduced to Asa Chang’s music in 2006 at the same time that we were living in Antwerp and creating the building blocks for our collaboration as Out Innerspace. Japanese percussionist Asa Chang founded the Tokyo Ska Paradise Orchestra and later joined programmer and guitarist Hidehiko Urayama and tabla player U-zhaan to create genre defying music with a portable sound system called Jun-Ray Tronics. The percussive patterns of Japanese and English text with Indian tabla and experimental electronic sound production is composed meticulously in a way that transcends borders and predisposed ways of telling and listening to stories through music. The female and male text have an incredibly intricate rhythmic relationship that is conceptually rich and otherworldly.  We were blown away and collected every Asa song we could find.

Where did your inspiration for Me So You So Me come from?

Me So You So Me is plucked from our daily life as a couple, re-imagined through an eclecticism of hand-picked cultural, aesthetic, popular and personal influences. We collaged everything from the family dog, Popeye, Astro Boy, Araki Nobuyoshi, as DNA for our characters, as DNA for dance making. We watched a load of cartoons specifically for the accepted violence, animated psychosis and extreme story telling. Everyday we closed our eyes and listened to Asa’s music and described to each other what we felt and saw and everyday these emerging alter-egos invaded our domestic performances as a couple. Eventually even brushing our teeth and arguing became outrageous and therapeutic acts of dance research.

Can you describe how you worked in the studio, the methods you used?

In studio we pursued an almost dogmatic application of music in hopes that it would challenge us to create new movement vocabulary pushed by the unpredictability, density and richness of Asa’s composition. This extreme dedication to the music was at times a downright exhausting process but it asked us to focus deeply on the places and ways we find inspiration, the methods we use to take inspiration into creation, and the way we express and embody the result. We rely heavily on our contrastive voices and rigour to stretch our instincts and foundations and to commit to our imaginations. It was important to us to never once stop considering the body as an unlimited and unchartered resource for the music and our ideas to be physical.

How did you decide on the title for the show?

We wanted to challenge ourselves to expose real content of our relationship through loveable and lethal beings; caricatures of our inner monsters, children, animals…to show the ways we are most different or alike. We asked ourselves How do you see me? Who do I want to be to you, with you, for you?…and with a little help and time we titled the work Me So You So Me.

Will this experience change the way you create dance pieces in the future?

We were thrust into a new level of experimental and inventive territory by committing so wholly to the music and it has changed the way that we continue to make dance. Though we won’t always use music this way, we are thriving on the shared research process and language it has opened up to us.

Me So You So Me by Out Innerspace runs at The Cultch from until Mar 1 at the Historic Theatre. Tickets are from $18 and can be purchased online http://bit.ly/MAaAvA, or by calling the box office at 604.251.1363.

An interview with Alvin Erasga Tolentino about ‘Shifting Geography’

From Feb 18 – 22, The Cultch is happy to present the world premiere of Shifting Geography, a new international dance creation choreographed by Alvin Erasga Tolentino (Co.ERASGA ,Vancouver) and Rafaële Giovanola (COCOONDANCE, Bonn, Germany). Using Vancouver and Bonn as inspiration, Shifting Geography  explores the body as a geographical metaphor with which to inquire about one’s origin and pathway.

In preparation for the world premiere we’ve caught up with Alvin Erasga Tolentino, Co.ERASGA’s founder and co-choreographer for Shifting Geography, to get some insight about his collaboration with COCOON DANCE and his company’s residency at The Cultch.

Q) Could you tell us how your passion for dance started?
It all started in my native land of the Philippines
when I was introduced to cultural dances in elementary school. Since then my dance journey has taken on a path beyond my imagination.

Q) We know you studied ballet in Winnipeg for two years, what made you change to modern dance?
Well in fact, I was already trained in modern dance before I entered the ballet world, but coming to the Royal Winnipeg Ballet was one of the best pieces of training I’ve had giving me a solid foundation in dance technique and it also allowed me to choose which dance form I wanted to fully dedicate myself to.

Q) Shifting Geography is a co-creation with German dance company COCOONDANCE. Could you tell us how this collaboration first came together?
My relationship with Rafaële Giovanola, Artistic Director of COCOONDANCE began through an introduction by Martin Inthamoussu – a former dance member of COCOONDANCE. Martin and I met in 2005 after meeting at a dance festival in Venezuela. We also collaborated on a piece of work for Co.ERASGA in 2011 that was featured at a festival in Bonn, Germany hosted by COCOONDANCE. Needless to say, meeting Rafaële then provided the inspiration and initiative to create Shifting Geography.

Q) What was it like working with Rafaële Giovanola on this project?
Challenging, as we both have our own aesthetics, ideas, and vision. However, we are also very generous to one another. The creative process has reminded me of the importance of working without ego. It’s integral for collaborators to meet creative challenges by building trust with fellow dancers and doing our best to create the best work possible.

Q) You and your company had a residency at The Cultch, this past July, could you describe for us this experience and how this helped develop your upcoming show?
I was thrilled to return to the historic performance space at The Cultch since I have performed in the space so many times during my years of dancing for other companies since the early 90s. The residency this past summer provided my company and the creative team of Shifting Geography a chance to have a performance space that facilitated the direction and imagination of the work that we were developing. We opened several creative processes as well to the public during the residency providing insights into the creative process and conversation with the artists.

Q) What can audience members expect from this production?
Bringing together onstage six fabulous dancers with native roots from Spain, Taiwan, Canada, Germany, Uruguay, and Romania. The debut of Spanish composer Pablo Palacio. To present dance as a sense of search where the body describes the shifts of state and feelings. Dancers observe this transformation in and out of the body in between performance mode and in the act of being presence. The body becomes the geography of states.

Q) What does it mean to you to be an active member of the Philippines community and a dancer with this heritage?
Filipinos are now the third largest minority group in the country, I am happy to represent contemporary dance to the widest community and to share my work and embrace the multi-racial that makes up diversity in Canada. I honor being Filipino to know my roots, culture, and history but I exist and practice as an artist to provide creativity for all.

Shifting Geography by Co.ERASGA and COCOONDANCE runs at The Cultch from Feb 18-22 at the Historic Theatre. Tickets are from $18 and can be purchased online at: tickets.thecultch.com, or by calling the box office at 604.251.1363.

Shifting Origins: Let’s Dance! Let’s Talk!

Alvin Erasga Tolentino (Artistic Director of Co.ERASGA)

For the next two-and-a-half weeks, members of Co.ERASGA and COCOONDANCE will be conducting a residency at The Cultch’s Historic Theatre to workshop their upcoming presentation of Shifting Geography. This transcontinental dance piece will have its world premiere on February 18, 2014 and is one of the most unique shows of our 13/14 season.

Rehearsal shot from ‘Shifting Geography’

Shifting Geography is the product of a collaboration between Vancouver-based choreographer Alvin Erasga Tolentino and Bonn (Germany)-based choreographer Rafaele Giovanola. Alvin is the founder and artistic director of Co.ERASGA, a contemporary dance company in Vancouver. Similarly, Rafaele is the artistic director of COCOONDANCE Company in Bonn, Germany where it all started. Alvin took up a two week residency at COCOONDANCE studio, where he and Rafaela began work on Shifting Geography. The dancers in the performance come from a wide range of backgrounds. Shifting Geography is as diverse and dynamic as the dancers whose collective roots span over four continents.

A shot of Alvin Erasga Tolentino in 'COLONIAL'

The Cultch was lucky enough to have an in-depth discussion about the creative process of choreographing for Shifting Geography with none other than Alvin Erasga Tolentino himself.

In your blog, you mention a “shift” from doing solo work to group work, what kind of changes took place emotionally and physically as you transitioned from dancing alone to dancing with others?

In my blog, I talked about coming from one-and-a- half years of dealing with solo work and performing in the last creation for Co.ERASGA, then transitioning to a new work for an ensemble for the 2013-14 season of the company. This shift of being the creator while working with six dancers in front of me is a shift in working relations towards dance…within the essence of dynamic presence, from much more solitude to  being with a group of dancers. I will not dance in the work but mainly co-create a full-length work. My role really in this piece is choreography and being the artistic director.

Emotionally, I am an observer of what goes on in the process and in dealing with the characters of the dancers to journey in the work with some intent.

Physically, I make choices that I feel will benefit and challenge my choreographic approaches and methods as well the performative capacity for each dancer and their experiential investments to the work.

What was the collaborative process in choreographing this dance and how did you incorporate both of your experiences in the piece?

The collaborative process involves Rafaele and I coming up with the material. We are also the ones who make decisions about the final product. The six diverse dancers who we work with provide the blood life to the dance within their physical means and presences.

If you had to describe Shifting Geography in one word, what would it be?

Presence.

The inspiration for Shifting Geography seems to be rooted in the transformations that take place when one encounters new places and cultures. How do your experiences from dancing abroad inform the dance and the heart of the dance?

Well, it starts with the fact that the work is a trans-continental project between Canada and Germany, Vancouver and Bonn. Two international dance companies taking risks to co-create and share resources and dancers. I think that we are looking at a very global perspective and economic sharing method and bringing an array of dancers that are also rooted to other parts of the world.

As travelling artists, we often encounter shift of changes within the environment. So the question that is posed becomes: how does the body react, adapt and function to these immediate changes in order to live the present experience, to function and re-configure within any given cultural space? Is the body with the mind or the other way around? I think this is the premise of our research; how these shifts affect our body, the way we think, and our emotions.

What component of the piece are you hoping to develop the most during your residency here at The Cultch?

We’re hoping to observe the environmental space and allow the creative work to response to it through physical expression. To locate our previously gathered materials from Bonn and see how they develop while here in Vancouver. This time, we also get to look at the performance space, giving us the chance as choreographers and dancers (also working with the lighting designer) to assess how the work and movements can breathe in the performance arena.

This show will be a hit with those who are “well-versed,” so to speak, with dance (especially contemporary dance). Do you think this performance can be accessed and understood by the general public? By those who do not dance, or who have only done a little bit of dance?

Absolutely. I think the capacity of dance speaks a lot, mainly because we work with a recognizable medium: the body. The body speaks across experiences including the mundane, abstract or narrative.  Our hope is to reach artistic depth that can garner communication or simply allow the audience to be able to relate emotionally so that experiences can be shared. Both universal and deeply personal experiences.

What can the public expect from co.ERASGA’s “Let’s Talk” sessions?

A chance to speak to the artists in depth, casually, and informally. To learn about their origins and their discovery of dance, how the practice has taken them to the present and their connection to dance continuing as a part of their life.

Single tickets will be available for Shifting Geography on August 6, 2013 and subscriptions are on sale now. Join us for a series of FREE artist chats, hosted by Co.ERASGA, on July 31, August 7 & 14: 4:30- 6 pm and get 50% off tickets to Shifting Geography!

IGNITE! Design Mentorship Goes Goth

IGNITE! Youth Mentorship Participant Nina Sky Robertson in 'Garbage Girl'

This week we’d like to spotlight one of the mentees from The Cultch’s

IGNITE! Mentorship Program — Nina Sky Robertson. Robertson was selected for a mentorship in Stage Design and has been learning the ropes from accomplished artist/designer, Alice Mansell. This brand new mentorship program in costume and set design is intended for aspiring young stage designers wishing to pursue a career in the arts. In the inaugural year of this program the assignment was to transform The Cultch lobby into a veritable Victorian gothic funeral parlor,  for the world premiere of Tara Cheyenne Friendenberg’s Highgate (exciting, no?)

With the show opening this week, we managed to do a little Q&A with Robertson and her experience in working on the set of Highgate.

A: Can you tell us a bit about your design background?

N: I am a life long ‘odd’ schooler. I have attended an assortment of public programs and schools ranging from a democratic free-school to an academically driven philosophy and english program. The most relevant educational experience to this mentorship has been a series of apprenticeships with world renowned artists from Vancouver, Toronto, and Mexico. I truly believe in life-long learning.

A sneek peek at The Cultch lobby for Highgate. Photo courtesy of Christine Quintana

A: Why The Cultch Mentorship Program?

N: I came to the mentorship through a conversation with Robert (Youth Program Manager). I had mentioned wanting to expand my textile arts practice into theatre design and two days later an incredibly lovely email arrived from him mentioning the program and asking me to apply.

A: Tell us a little bit about what the mentorship has entailed.

N: It has entailed – at least for Highgate and with Alice – a considerable amount of draping (predominantly Gothic, Victorian objects) some pattern drafting, not to mention the chance to create a relationship with Alice and gain insight into her process and history.

Highgate creator Tara Cheyenne Friedenberg (Dance/Choreography) and Alice Mansell (Stage Design)

A: What are your plans for the future?

N: I intend to continue to expand my textile arts practice, hopefully moving further into the theatre community in the next few years and continue with a broad smattering of other arts, travel and academic projects.

If you want to see Robertson and Mansell’s creation firsthand, you’ll have to swing by The Cultch and get your tickets to Highgate which runs May 1 –  4 and invites you for ‘a morbid romp through Victorian funerary culture. Let’s be honest – who doesn’t love a good morbid romp?

Part 2: Choreographer Victor Quijada shares the story behind his unique style of dance

This week we bring you the second part of our exclusive two-part interview with the award winning choreographer and creative director of RUBBERBANDance Group, Victor Quijada. His work, which examines human relationships through a seamless marriage of classical, contemporary, and urban aesthetics, is performed internationally.

In part two, Quijada shares with us the process of choreographing Gravity of Center ( opening at The Cultch Feb 19) as well as the process of adapting the stage production to film.

SC: Gravity of Center is the ninth work you’ve choreographed with RUBBERBANDance and many say that it’s perhaps your greatest work yet. What do you think sets this piece apart from your other works?

VQ: I think that it comes down to the fact that I simply had more experience when I created it, and a lot more practice. I had already tried out so many of my ideas, and all of those experiments with those old ideas (successful or not) were informing this new, bigger challenge. This piece really was a much bigger challenge that I had placed in front of me. However I was also more prepared and ready to take on this challenge.

Also, I had a great cast. Plus, my past experiences had taught me so much about casting and directing. Overall, I was a better director and a better choreographer during this creation. Also, I must say that having a great cast, and a great team of collaborators helped make this piece one of the best we’ve had.

This is the most narrative work I’ve ever made and I was surprised at how challenging it was to actually accomplish this. In the end, I’m very proud of it.

SC: Gravity of Center explores the idea that everyone is both at the center of the world and orbiting around others. Can you elaborate on this idea?

VQ: ,Simply put: At times we are followers, at other times we lead. There are moments when we take care of others, and moments when we are taken care of. We all want to be independent, but the truth is that we need each other. I believe this is true in the micro, as well as in the macro.

SC: How do you explore this idea through movement?

VQ: I was interested in behavioural phenomena that were found in both animals and in humans: herd and pack mentality, migratory and nomadic tendancies, and social hierarchy, specifically looking at dominant and submissive roles within a group.

SC: What was your inspiration when choreographing Gravity of Center?

VQ: I was inspired by my dancers, by composer Jasper Gahunia; my conversations with lighting designer Yan Lee Chan. I was also inspired by films and the craft of screenwriting.

SC: Can you talk about the process of adapting Gravity of Center from a stage performance to film? What were some of the challenges and considerations?

VQ: The biggest challenge was scaling down the 75 minute journey into a much smaller time frame. On the other hand I was very excited to work with Thibaut Duverneix as a co-director and with cinematographer Christophe Collette. I was confident that we would be able to achieve the contrasting sense of grandeur and subtlety in this film.

SC: How do you hope to inspire or transform Vancouver audiences when performing Gravity of Center on The Cultch stage?

VQ: I hope audiences get that feeling I get sometimes after seeing a great film that is so rich and so complete that I keep thinking about for days, weeks afterward. There are some films that keep me aware of my breathing, they keep me aware of my surroundings. They keep me on the lookout for something amazing to happen, or to take a chance to try something new, or to be ready for an adventure.

It’s as if in my brain I am saying, “Well, it happened in the film, and there was a writer that thought it up, and there was a director that brought it to life, and there were these talented actors that made me believe, so… VICTOR, DO SOMETHING!!”

Gravity of Centre runs at The Cultch February 19 – 23, 2013. Tickets start at $17 and can be purchased at tickets.thecultch.com, by phone at 604.251.1363, or in person at The Cultch Box Office, 1895 Venables St.