Thank you to our Cultch audiences for a triumphant close to our 16/17 Season!

Thank you for a wonderful 16/17 season!

What an amazing year it has been! The 16/17 Season was one of The Cultch’s most successful thanks to the continued patronage of all of our amazing supporters!

With 21 theatrical shows in our three venues, as well as countless amazing rental and festival shows; 11 Gallery shows; plus three nights of great music including, The Sicilian Project, DakhaBrakha, and the inaugural East Side Live, 16/17 was a great season for us, and we are so glad that you joined us for it!

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We had many grand adventures together; here is a look back at a few of the many highlights:

We joined together to watch a version of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night completely in Hindi (Piya Behrupiya).

Piya Behrupiya

Photo by Company Theatre

We saw paper fights break out between audience members and bendy contortionist performers (The Pianist)…maybe we threw a few pieces ourselves…

‘The Pianist.’ Photo by Roaming the Planet

We saw the dawn (dusk?) of a new era in US politics ushered in as we sat in the dark Historic Theatre and did a little voting of our own (Fight Night).

Cast of Fight Night

Together we raised money for Cultch Connects, bringing over 1,200 people into the theatre who might not be able to attend otherwise; including families who are struggling to make ends meet, caring for a child with a serious illness, or who are new to Canada.

Cultch Connects brought over 1,200 people to the theatre with your help!

We joined together with our friends and families to make the fourth installment of East Van’s favourite holiday tradition the biggest selling show in The Cultch’s history! (East Van Panto: Little Red Riding Hood) Go Panto Go!

YAY Panto! Photo by Emily Cooper

We celebrated the powerful work of creative women for an entire month during Femme February!

Femme February included Mouthpiece, NeoIndigenA, am a, and the book launch of Girl Positive

We chuckled, chortled, and cackled together as we paid tribute to the 30+ year legacy of a local restaurant with a big heart, while singing along to catchy hits like ‘Testosterone’ and ‘Let a Girl Eat’ (Elbow Room Cafe: The Musical).

Elbow Room Cafe: The Musical cast members sing ‘Testosterone’. Photo by Tina Krueger Kulic

We spent time with old and new friends as we gathered to watch some of The Cultch’s favourite performers like: Esme Massengill, Mrs. Edna Rural and everyone’s favourite flightless fairy -Schnitzel (The Daisy Theatre).

No one is immune to the cuteness of Schnitzel! Photo by Alejandro Santiago

We felt the spray of ice on our faces as we gathered on the ice of Britannia Ice Rink to see Vertical Influences.

Audience members sit on the ice during Vertical Influences. Photo by Roaming the Planet

We mourned together as we watched heartbreaking and poignant Children of God, and then we sat together in the theatre to discuss how to respond to the dark legacy of residential schools.

Children of God cast members lead a discussion after the opening night performance. Photo by Roaming the Planet

And, after so many shows and fabulous events – we joined together to share meaningful conversation over many a glass of wine!

Sharing a drink with friends in the York Theatre. Photo by Roaming the Planet

We would love to hear some of your favourite memories of the 16/17 season; what are your favourite moments? 

Don’t forget to buy your subscription for our 17/18 Season soon. Shows are already filling up, get the best seating while you can! Click here for the full lineup.

Thank you for choosing to make The Cultch and the arts a part of your life!

Box Office Summer Hours:

Monday- Saturday: 12-4pm

Sunday: Closed

Also, open 2 hour prior to all performances

Century Song: Five reasons you need to see this groundbreaking show

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 Century Song, presented with the PuSh Performing Arts Festival, is one of the most unique shows of The Cultch’s 15/16 season! The multimedia show provides a thrilling look at 100 years in black  history from a women`s perspective. The piece, a “music recital” study of ephemeral aspects of the Black Canadian experience over the past century, is completely wordless. The story is a survey from servitude to sexuality; pop culture to protest. Here are five reasons you should watch this groundbreaking piece of art. For an interactive experience click here.

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  1. Black History Month:  With February being Black History Month, Century Song provides a great opportunity for  Vancouver audiences to educate themselves, from a Black woman’s perspective, about Canadian Black history. Here’s what Ross Manson, Director of Century Song, says about this dynamic, “I learned the distinction between white and black feminism in my research into the 1970s. White feminism called for equality. Black feminism called for justice. The difference is vast. In short – I learned that as a country there is much under the surface of our history that most of us aren’t aware of. And so the question formed: why does what is taught in our schools omit so much?_MG_7652
  2.  Modern Dance: Neema Bickersteth and choreographer Kate Alton (Dora Award winner and K. M. Hunter award winner) co-created a unique body of modern dance movement featured heavily in Century Song. Alton creates thought-provoking, emotionally engaging theatrical dances that are as much explorations of the mind as of the body, working with writers, directors, and vocal coaches to develop inter-disciplinary performance works that pack an intellectual and emotional punch._MG_7774C
  3. Classical Music: The performance utilizes the UBC Opera-trained and Dora Nominated Neema Bickersteth on vocalise (wordless vocals) and music by some of the past 100 years’ most adventurous composers– 1912: Sergei Rachmaninoff (Russia); 1935: Olivier Messaien (France); 1950: John Cage (USA); 1978: Georges Aperghis (Greece); 2012: Reza Jacobs (Canada); 2016: Piano, Gregory Oh (Canada) and 2016: Percussion, Computers, Composition, Music Co-Direction, Debashis Sinha (Canada)._MG_6798C2
  4.  Innovative Video: The show’s projections were made by Germany’s fettFilm known for their innovative video production. By combining video with other media the video artists Momme Hinrichs and Torge Möller primarily create multifaceted works of art which do not merely decorate the stage or coexist with it but instead blend various artistic levels.They develop and realise their ideas, from the initial stage to the final presentation, in close cooperation with directors and artists. For amazing video of the performance click here. _MG_7291 - Copy
  5. Internationally Acclaimed Theatre Company:  Century Song has been developed by the Toronto-based, international award-winning performance company, Volcano Theatre, in partnership with Crooked Figure Dances, and the Moveable Beast Collective with direction by Dora Award-winning director Ross Manson. “One of those companies that every great theatre city needs – bold, experimental, and bubbling with ideas.” – Toronto Star

Century Song is at The Cultch’s  Historic Theatre until February 6. Tickets are from $20. Get your tickets here.

Images:  Photos of Neema Bickersteth by John Lauener

Leftovers, An Interview with Charles Demers

Leftovers_Landscape

Charles Demers and Baby Demers. Photo By Simon Hayter.

One of the stars of CBC Radio’s The Debaters, a best-selling author, and one of Canada’s finest stand-up comedians, Charlie Demers also lectures in creative writing at UBC and continues to fight the good fight as a political activist. His newest adventure Leftovers, which he co-created with Marcus Youssef and also stars in, is presented by The Cultch and PuSh International Performing Arts Festival from Jan 26 to 30 at the York Theatre. We had a chance to chat with Charles about his latest show, its inspirations, and the political landscape in general.

1. You are the playwright for the hugely successful East Van Panto, which has its own brand of political speak. How does Leftovers differ?

I’d say that the biggest difference is that, in Panto-land, we’re in a marshmallowy, cartoon world where everything is ultimately going to be okay — we never really feel unsafe in the Panto. So the political mockery, the potshots, the little jokes, even when they are about real, awful stuff happening in the world — gentrification, uncontrolled speculation, political corruption, whatever — the jokes come from a place of safety. Those bad things can’t get at us in the Panto, because we’re playing pretend. In Leftovers, we’re leaving the door open to all the vicious beasts and monsters in the world. Capitalism isn’t a harmless subject of satire in this world — in this particular show, it’s a bulldozer, it’s everywhere, and we’re scared of it. We’re supposed to be scared of it, even when we’re laughing.

2. You are a very busy man engaged in many varying projects from being a lecturer to an author/playwright, to standup/acting, where does the inspiration and drive come from to create these artistic feats?

Well, the cynical part of me would say that core, unshakeable feelings of financial and emotional insecurity will forever drive me to try and find the greatest number of both paycheques as well as strangers to tell me I’m doing good things. That’s partially true, at least. But I love the life of ideas, I love engaging people with ideas, and I’ve been lucky and privileged enough to get the opportunity to do that on a really nice scale, with a number of people and in a number of different ways, and I will work as hard as I have to and say yes to as many opportunities as I’m presented with that will keep that process alive.

3. Ronald Reagan has been the poster boy for dumb politicians, which Canadian politician do you feel comes close to him?

Well, Jean Chrétien play-acted that he was dumb, but he was actually brilliantly cagey and that was all Machiavellian performance, I think. I had thought that our new man, Justin Trudeau, was a major intellectual lightweight, but as it turns out, there may be something of Chrétien in him after all. No, I’d say the closest thing we’ve seen to the Reagan brand of oblivious cruelty here is probably Bill Vander Zalm, or our current premier, Ms. Clark.

4. Do you find it easier collaborating with others as you have done with Marcus Youssef for Leftovers or creating solo?

It’s interesting — in some ways, I think there’s a mistaken feeling that sets in early on in the process that working with a collaborator is going to be easier, because there’s someone else there to share the load, and that’s true. But having a co-creator ultimately, I think, means that you’re going to work harder, because you’re constantly being challenged about what the piece is, beyond the limited, comfortable thing that you maybe thought it would be. So it makes the show an infinitely richer thing, because you’re being pushed and challenged in ways that you wouldn’t ever do if you were working on your own. In a really good way.

5. East Van and The Cultch have a history of challenging the status quo in what they represent, does the area of East Van, the neighbourhood, play into how and what you present?

I didn’t grow up in East Van, but I lived here when I was a baby (my first home was the rented ground floor of a Vancouver Special on Kaslo street), and I started coming back to hang out on the Drive, at La Quena and for foosball at Joe’s, as a teenager. I’ve lived here for years and the neighbourhood has shaped me culturally and politically and socially and in every other way possible. I’ve been watching shows at The Cultch since I was a teenager, seen so many of the amazing shows that made me want to create theatre myself, that it’s almost impossible for me to answer this question, it’s so big. Let me put it this way: the first time my aunt and uncle babysat my daughter, when she was still shy of a year old, they took her for a a walk in her stroller, and the only time she stopped crying was when they were on the Drive.

6. You pose the question,” Why are we so accepting of the world as it is?” Without giving away too much info about Leftovers, do you have the answer?

Ultimately, I think that the often bloody back and forth of the 20th century drained us of our political imaginations. We’ve hardened against the idea of utopia — and while it’s true that we can’t build utopia in the real world, there’s something profoundly depressing and disempowering about a world where we don’t even entertain the idea, where we don’t even play with thought experiments about what profound changes in the way we organize society might look like. Given this context, I think that a non-cynical comic sensibility is important for the left; to be a little bit ironic, a little bit smirking, is a useful guard against the nightmares of the 20th century, I think. But without other feelings — feelings of love, or fear, or anger — that sort of comedy can become politically harmless, and that harmlessness makes us even more cynical. That’s why we’re excited to be doing a comedy show that isn’t, in this case, only stand-up — to be able to tell jokes but also have those real moments of feeling alongside them

Get your tickets now before they’re gone! An extra show has already been added due to demand!

A LEFTOVERS GLOSSARY

Toussaint Louverture: (1743 –1803) Leader of the Haitian Revolution.

Maximillien Robespierre: (1758 –1794) One of most influential figures of the French Revolution and the Reign of Terror.

Tibet: A region on the Tibetan Plateau in Asia northeast of the Himalayas; occupied by China

Frederick Douglass: (1818–1895) African-American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman.

Emma Goldman: (1869 –1940) Anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches.

Oakridge: An area in south-central Vancouver with an average household income of $65,000.

Jean Jaurès: (1859-1914) French Socialist leader.

The Paris Commune: Radical socialist and revolutionary government that ruled Paris from 18 March to 28 May 1871.

Commercial Drive: Roadway in Vancouver, BC that goes through the neighbourhood of Grandview-Woodland. Better known as “The Drive”.

Rosa Luxemburg: (1871 –1919) Marxist theorist, philosopher, economist and revolutionary socialist of Polish-Jewish descent.

Leon Blum: (1872 –1950) French politician, identified with the moderate left, and three time Prime Minister of France.

Michael Corleone: Main character in the Godfather film trilogy

Clement Attlee: (1883 –1967) British politician who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1945-1951) and the Leader of the Labour Party (1935-1955).

Jawaharial Nehru: (1889 –1964) The first Prime Minister of India

Ho Chi Minh: (1890 –1969) Vietnamese Communist revolutionary leader who was prime minister

Deng Xiaoping: (1904 –1997) Chinese revolutionary and statesman influenced by Marxism-Leninism.

Salvador Allende: (1908 –1973) First Marxist to become president of a Latin American country through open elections.

Che Guevara: (1928 –1967) Argentine Marxist revolutionary, physician, author, guerrilla leader, diplomat, and military theorist.

Stuart McLean: Canadian radio broadcaster, humourist, host of the CBC Radio program The Vinyl Cafe.

Henry Kissinger: American diplomat and political scientist.

Karl Marx: Philosopher, economist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist.

Maoism: Political, social, economic, and military theories and policies advocated by Mao Zedong.

Bernie Sanders: American politician and the junior Senator from Vermont self-described socialist and democratic socialist.

French Revolution: A period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France that lasted from 1789 until 1799.

The Four Horsemen: A History Lesson

We are thrilled to have The Four Horsemen Project opening this week here at The Cultch! This production was a huge success during the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival  in 2008 and has since been on tour in Dublin, Berlin and  across Canada. Since the production is based on the poetry of Toronto’s original Four Horsemen, we thought it might be interesting to give you a bit of history and insight into the poets and their work to get you excited about the show.

“There’s no precedent for a show like this… brilliantly coutured performers…inventive animation… Be prepared to add your laughter and applause to the sounds in this thrilling, one-of-a-kind show” – Now Magazine

The original Four Horsemen, Rafael Barreto-Rivera, Paul Dutton, Steve McCaffery, and bpNichol were a spoken word performance group during the 1970s avant-garde poetry era. All four of the Horsemen published individual work as well as worked in a collaborative group. For many years there was limited access to the sound recordings that were available, as much of it disappeared with bpNichol when he passed away in 1988. This is what Kate Alton and Ross Manson (Volcano Productions) discovered when they attempted to do some research in preparation for The Four Horsemen Project. Now, many recordings are accessible online through the help and support of Ellie Nichol and the remaining Horsemen.

bpNichol was originally from Vancouver, BC and was most well-known as a writer from Jim Henson’s children’s TV show, Fraggle Rock. In his lifetime he wrote and published a variety of work and collaborated with many different artists, not limited to the Four Horsemen. Nichol considered sound poetry to be his way to express emotion. The notion is that a poem is far more than words on a page, but a manifestation of one’s entire being. This is one of the primary goals set by The Four Horsemen Project, and in realizing this the audience becomes aware of the nature of language, rather than content.

Photo by Itai Erdal

Photo by Itai Erdal

Poetry encompasses sound, breath and the human body and these artists breathe life into this nearly-forgotten work. The Four Horsemen Project runs from October 28 – November 2. Tickets are available online or through the box office at 604.251.1363.

Tim Crouch shines a light on bullying in I, Malvolio

On January 30, as part of the 2013 PuSh International Performing Arts Festival, UK playwright and performer Tim Crouch brings his latest production, I, Malvolio, to The Cultch. A celebrated international performer, Crouch has developed a large following here in Vancouver, thanks to past visits performing My Arm and An Oak Tree in 2007, and ENGLAND in 2009.

I, Malvolio opens at The Cultch Jan 30

For I, Malvolio, Crouch uses humour as a means of exposing the harm caused in bullying and practical jokes in a re-imagined version of Shakespeare’s famous play Twelfth Night. In this version of the classic tale, the story is told through the eyes of the pompous steward Malvolio, a perspective rarely seen and explored in theatre.

Tim Crouch re-imagines Twelfth Night in a brilliant one-man show that unlocks Shakespeare’s play for new audiences

In Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, Malvolio is bullied and picked on by the other characters, ultimately winding up as the crux of a hurtful joke. In the end, poor Malvolio meets a pitiful demise when he’s written off as insane, and locked away in a dark chamber. In his final words he pledges revenge on the other characters for treating him so poorly.

I, Malvolio is a charged, hilarious and sometimes unsettling rant from a man adrift in front of a cruel audience

In this version of the play, Crouch’s clever script gives audiences a unique position from which to view the issue of bullying – from the eyes of the bully. As Crouch explains in the video below, “It’s a very funny piece. He is a clown and we often enjoy laughing at people who are going through terrible situations and circumstances. Malvolio is really at the bottom of the pile and he encourages you laughing at him, and then he challenges you for laughing at him.”

It’s a performance that makes you wonder: what’s acceptable about laughing at someone who’s been broken down and humiliated? As Crouch puts it in this interview with journalist Mark Fisher, “It [the play] is about how far one is prepared to take pleasure in somebody’s cruelty to other people.”

I, Malvolio is an entertaining production that reinforces valuable lessons along the way. Don’t miss your chance to see this contemporary spin on a classic play!

I, Malvolio runs at The Cultch January 30 – February 10, 2013. Tickets start at $17 and can be purchased at tickets.thecultch.com, by phone at 604.251.1363, or in person at The Cultch Box Office, 1895 Venables St.

2013 at the Cultch – Programming as diverse as you

By Caitlin Bryant

It’s 2013 and we are ready to embark on a brand new year of performance that will warm the heart, push boundaries, expand the mind, and amaze the senses. Here’s what’s coming up!

Don Juan
Three songs, two duels and a road trip to hell
Blackbird Theatre (Vancouver)
Historic Theatre at The Cultch
December 26 – January 26, 2013
Opening night: December 28, 8pm

Peter Jorgensen stars as the legendary rogue and Simon Webb plays his beleaguered servant in Blackbird Theatre’s (Waiting for Godot) daring new adaptation of Molière’s most scandalous comedy, Don Juan.

Festooned with swordplay, seduction, and song, this satiric tale follows the irresistible rogue and defiant hedonist down an unrepentant path to hellfire and brimstone.

Music features a newly commissioned rock mass in Latin (with electric guitar) from composer Peter Berring, and arias from Mozart’s Don Giovanni, sung and played on the guitar and harpsichord by the leading actors.

Click here for more information. Tickets are from $17 and are available at tickets.thecultch.com, by phone at 604-251-1363, or in person at 1895 Venables Street.

Grim & Fischer
One granny’s showdown with Death himself
WONDERHEADS Theatre (Portland, Oregon)
Vancity Culture Lab at The Cultch

January 3 – 13, 2013
Opening night: January 3, 8pm

Winner of the 2011 Cultchivating The Fringe Award, Grim and Fischer is the epic tale of one mischievous Granny’s journey as she is pit against the Grim Reaper and must confront the inevitable question that we all face: what is it to know your end is nigh?

Click here to watch the hilarious trailer for Grim and Fischer.

Click here for more information. Tickets are $30 and are available at tickets.thecultch.com, by phone at 604-251-1363, or in person at 1895 Venables Street.

Cutting Edge Performing Arts Partnerships

As one of Vancouver’s signature performing arts festivals, The Cultch is thrilled to partner with the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival (January 15 – February 3, 2013) once again.

As a part of this exciting partnership, The Cultch will be presenting The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart taking place at East Vancouver’s own WISE Hall and I, Malvolio, taking centre stage at The Cultch’s Historic Theatre.

The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart
Extend your Robbie Burns Day  celebrations with a lock-in at the WISE Hall
National Theatre of Scotland (Glasgow)
The WISE hall (1882 Adanac Street)
January 29 – February 2, 2013
Opening night: January 29, 8pm

Robbie Burns Day is fast approaching and so now is the time for a supernatural lock-in with the National Theatre of Scotland’s band of actors and musicians.

Grab a beer and a seat with friends for this heartwarming and whimsical story infused with rhyme and Scottish karaoke. The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart takes theatre into the pub where stories are told, re-told and passed on.

Click here to watch The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart’s preview.

Click here for more information. Tickets are $47 and are available at tickets.thecultch.com, by phone at 604-251-1363, or in person at 1895 Venables Street.

I, Malvolio
Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night as seen through his most pent- up steward
Tim Crouch
January 30 – February 10, 2013
Opening night: January 30, 8pm

Tim Crouch’s I, Malvolio is a re-imagining of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night but with its spotlight uniquely trained on Malvolio, the notoriously wronged steward with his hilarious tale of woe.

A story of lost dignity, prudery, practical jokes and bullying, this one-man act of storytelling alchemy draws us deep into the madness of Shakespeare’s classic comedy.

Click here to watch the trailer for Tim Crouch’s, I, Malvolio.

Click here for more information. Tickets are from $17 and are available at tickets.thecultch.com, by phone at 604-251-1363, or in person at 1895 Venables Street.

Gravity of Center
Hip hop meets ballet
RUBBERBANDDance Group (Montreal)
February 19 – 23, 2013
Opening night: February 19, 8pm

Critically acclaimed choreographer Victor Quijada presents his ninth work, Gravity of Center. In this exploration of individuality and interdependence with its obvious and inevitable struggles, raw movement expresses all the weight of this adversarial relationship. The dancers interweave, fight, crave, and hustle in an astonishing fluidity of action.

Click here to watch the Gravity of Center trailer.

Click here for more information. Tickets are from $17 and are available at tickets.thecultch.com, by phone at 604-251-1363, or in person at 1895 Venables Street.

*Holiday housekeeping note: The Cultch administration office will be closed from December 24 – January 1 and will re-open at 10am on Tuesday, January 2.  Have a safe and happy holiday from all of us at The Cultch!

Box Office hours:

December 24: 12 – 4pm, December 25: Closed, December 26: 12 – 4pm, December 27, 28: 12 – 6pm, December 29: 12 – 4pm, December 30: Closed, December 31: 12 – 6pm, January 1, 2013: Closed

The Enchantment of Bretta Gerecke

Bretta, along with being the set designer, has also directed the play "Elephant Wake"

Bretta, along with being the set designer, has also directed the play "Elephant Wake"

Bretta Gerecke is the set, lighting, and costume designer for Elephant Wake. She graduated from the University of Manitoba with a Bachelor of Interior Design in 1992 and from the University of Alberta with a Master of Fine Arts in Theatre Design in 1996. She is the recipient of 13 Elizabeth Sterling Haynes Awards, an Enbridge Award for Best Emerging Artist, and was short-listed in 2006 and 2009 for the elite Siminovitch Prize. Gerecke is currently the resident designer for the Catalyst Theatre in Edmonton.

I’ve read you were originally interested in pursuing a career as an architect. Can you tell us a bit about your shift to theatre and set design and what drew you towards it?

Theatre is so immediate – so interactive – it is an organic art form. Ever it is an exciting, volatile, unpredictable career – perfect for an adrenaline junkie!

Who or what were your greatest influences when you began?

Influences are tough – I am always drawn to architects and installation artists. I believe there are no real limits in what we do – shoot for the sky and cross your fingers.

Where do you find the inspiration for your work?

Everywhere. I try always to keep my eyes and ears open. It can be a construction site, a concert, a group of protesters. There is nothing more powerful to me than the excitement of going into the unknown.

The set of "Elephant Wake"

The set of "Elephant Wake"

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Best Before – A Curatorial Statement

by PuSh Festival Executive Director Norman Armour and Senior Curator Sherrie Johnson

In keeping with our curatorial vision to nurture creativity, foster innovation and stimulate dialogue and exchange, PuSh commissioned the German company Rimini Protokoll to embark on a new creation for our 2010 Festival with the simple premise that the work embody the notion of futurism.

Electronic Artist Brady Marks

Electronic Artist Brady Marks

Rimini Protokoll (www.rimini-protokoll.de) is the label given to a unique triumvirate of directors: Helgard Haug, Stephan Kaegi and Daniel Wetzel. Founded in 2000, this internationally acclaimed group has created over 20 new works of theatre—all sharing a very distinct house style. Having studied together at the Institute of Applied Theatre Studies, Justus Liebig-Universität Gießen (Giessen, Germany), and working in various combinations, the three artists behind Rimini Protokoll devise new work out of the material provided by real life. They have become the central figures in a documentary movement that has taken centre stage in German theatres over the last few years.

Rimini Protokoll has a distinct vision of the world, but what stands out in their productions is their belief in the impact of their work on society. They tackle major social issues with their innovative and visionary productions—works that redefine the very boundaries of theatre. Rimini Protokoll are the change-makers in our field; they themselves represent a contemporary futurism as leaders in the documentary theatre movement. International commissions and co-productions are key to the PuSh Festival’s evolving identity. They bring new insights, ideas and approaches to the artistic milieu within which we work, as well as offering a deeper understanding of the world-at-large to our audiences.

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