Nov 29 - Dec 27

In My Day: Gallery Exhibition

An exhibition of ephemera accompanying the play, In My DaY

GALLERY HOURS
Mon- Fri, 12-6 PM

Sat: 12-4PM

1895 Venables St.
Vancouver

Visual Portfolio, Posts & Image Gallery for WordPress

Women Around the World Are Affected by AIDS, World AIDS Day 1990

Women Around the World Are Affected by AIDS,
World AIDS Day 1990
Poster, photo by Robin Barnett.
Rosemary Brown, Moderator at Public Forum, November 29, 1990.

Women Take Back the Future, International Women's Day 1985

Women Take Back the Future,
International Women’s Day 1985
Poster, design by Nola Johnston.
March and Rally, Vancouver Art Gallery.
International Women's Day first observed in Europe, March 1911.This legacy of activism continues today, advocating for women’s voices to be heard regarding their health and well-being living with HIV/AIDS.

Angles, cover

Angles
LGBT newspaper, November 1988 issue.
Cover. Front-page shout-out for International Lesbian Week.Events included lesbian storytelling, art, unlearning antisemitism, unlearning classism, Femme Workshop, Sexpertease Erotic Show, the “We Are Everywhere” parade, and a lesbians-only dance.
Photo by Richard Banner.

Angles, page 15

Angles
LGBT newspaper, November 1988 issue.
Page 15. November 1988 random sample of “things to do” and “places to be” for LGBTQ2+, PWA, and allies to whet and support their culinary, social, cultural, sexual, activist, and other appetites.

Silence = Death, ACT UP New York

Silence = Death, ACT UP New York
Logo, on black T-shirt.
The logo was designed 1986 by ACT-UP New York members and sympathizers. Designers of that logo “turned the Nazis’ downward-pointing pink triangle, sewn onto the uniforms of gay men in concentration camps, so that it pointed upward, thereby permanently connecting the AIDS crisis visually to the legacy of the Holocaust but at the same time subverting it.”
— Sarah Schulman, Let the Record Show: A Political History of ACT UP New York, 1987-1993, page 322.

Living Positive

Living +Magazine.
May-June 2011, cover photo of protest, BC Legislature, Victoria, March 26, 1986.
Shown in photo: Kevin Brown, Ken Mann, and Warren Jenson— founders of Vancouver Persons with AIDS Society.
Photo by Daniel Collins.

Lurking in the Shadows

Lurking in the Shadows (2018)“I can still be charged if I don’t disclose to a sex partner and be labelled as a sexual offender.” — Val Nicholson, community-based researcher and artist.

XI International Conference on AIDS, July 7-12, 1996 Vancouver

XI International Conference on AIDS, July 7-12, 1996 Vancouver
Photos by John Kozachenko, 1996.
[upper]: Posters read “PM Chretien, we're dying for a National AIDS Strategy.”
[lower]: PM Chretien refused to attend the Conference, sent Minister of Health, David Dingwall. Activists turned their backs in protest. — John Kozachenko

Walk and Parade

Walk and Parade
Photos by John Kozachenko.
[upper]: Downtown Eastside contingent, AIDS Walk 1997, Stanley Park.
[middle]: PWA contingent, Gay Pride Parade 1996 — coffins
representing those that died of neglect.
[lower]: Affirmative AIDS Action contingent, Gay Pride Parade 1996.

Red Road HIVAIDS Network, Bloodlines Magazine (back cover)

Red Road HIV/AIDS Network,
Bloodlines MagazineFall 2012 issue.
Art and Design Director: Tania Willard.
Back cover.

Red Road HIVAIDS Network, Bloodlines Magazine (front cover)

Red Road HIV/AIDS Network,
Bloodlines MagazineFall 2012 issue.
Art and Design Director: Tania Willard.
Front cover, Val Nicholson shown on front cover.

AIDS Walk for Life

AIDS Walk for Life
White T-shirt.
“My Thinking Cap (Life with HIV)”
Art: Joe Average, 2007.

The Best-Kept Secret…

The Best-Kept Secret…Poster.
MARS (‘Men’s Attitude About Relationships & Sexuality’) research project.
Art: Joe Average, 1996.

ONE WORLD ONE HOPE

One World One Hope,
XI International Conference on AIDS, Vancouver 1996Poster.
Art: Joe Average, 1994.

Vancouver Men’s Chorus

Vancouver Men’s ChorusPoster.
Canada’s first gay chorus. Debut concert December 1981. Their artistry recognized by Canada Council for the Arts, 1991. Many performances as fundraisers to support PWAs.

Guy to Goddess

Guy to Goddess
Book, published by Ten Speed Press, 1994.
Text by Bill Richardson, photographs by Rosamond Norbury.
From the Introduction:
“For me drag is not about passing as a woman. It’s about being big. About exaggeration, creating a character, turning heads on the street. Mostly drag is about having a blast!”

The Dot Party

The Dot Party
Community Fundraiser for PWA Emergency Fund and Gay Games 1990.
Drag Queen extravaganza. September 1989, “Dots a must!”
Attendees arrived attired in dots.

Theatre Cares Vancouver

Theatre Cares Vancouver
Logo, art, and design: Ken McDonald, c. 1993.
Theatre Cares Vancouver was founded 1993 by Mary Phillips Prize recipient Dawn Brennan to raise funds and awareness for HIV/AIDS support and other causes.

Faces

Faces
White T-shirt.
Art by Joe Average, 1992.

Plague of the Gorgeous photos and book

[upper] — Photo of Allan Morgan, cast member, 1995. Image used on cover of book “Plague of the Gorgeous and Other Tales.”
[middle] — Book, collected tales by Gordon Armstrong, Colin Thomas, Lisa Lowe, Stuart Blackley & Kevin Gregg, and Peter Eliot Weiss; published by Scirocco Drama, Montreal, 1996. 
“Plague of the Gorgeous and Other Talesis dedicated to memory of John Moffat
Because he was out about being gay.
Because he was out about living with AIDS.
 Because he was funny and sexy and generous.
Because he was a prodigiously talented actor.
And because we miss him.” 
[lower] — Photo of cast and crew by Jamie Griffith Photography, 1995;
from inaugural production by Out West Performance Society, 1995. 

Plague of the Gorgeous, poster

Plague of the Gorgeous and Other TalesPoster, 1995.
Out West Performance Society’s production of the play, Gastown Theatre.

Theatre Positive, ephemera

Theatre Positive, Ephemera
Theatre Positive was a grassroots theatre company made upof HIV positive people and allies from the Vancouver theatre community dedicated to connecting artistically, educationally, and emotionally to peers and public about living with AIDS.

Theatre Positive, West End Stories

Theatre Positive, West End Stories
Promotional card. “West End Stories,”
written by Theatre Positive Collective and
directed by Ilena Lee Cramer, Vancouver Fringe, 2003.

Ribbons from around Mother Earth, I am living with HIV

Ribbons from around Mother Earth, I am living with HIV (2011-present)
— Val Nicholson, community-based researcher and artist.The Red Ribbon in 1991 became a symbol for indicating support and compassion for persons living with HIV/AIDS and for their caregivers.

You promised me poems…

 “You promised me poems…” (1996)
“…Instead, you gave me HIV. This painting [from 1996] reflects coming to terms with an HIV diagnosis. Broken trust, disappointment, fear and grief, all weigh heavily emotionally before the physical manifestation of the virus takes its toll on the body.” — Terry Howard, artist and community-based researcher.

Cocktail Party

 “This is Not a Cocktail Party”
Artist: Peggy Frank (pegfrank.ca)
Material: - Original sculpture - Plastic pill bottles on a plastic form and framework.Peggy Frank created a seven-foot sculpture in 2013 and toured Canadian HIV resource centres before arriving in St Andrews, N.B. for a sculpture competition. The piece speaks about the over 2000 medication and supplement bottles that Peggy used in 25 years of living with HIV. It also addresses the insanity of medical language. Photo Credit: Danielle Popes

Timeline

Interactive Timeline
Artist: Peggy Frank (pegfrank.ca)
Material: Pen and pastel on canvas
The history of HIV is filled with public events, discrimination, screams for justice for everyone, and openings and closures of important hubs for people living positively. This timeline is an emotional journeyAlthough graphic recording artist, Peggy Frank used many sources of historic data, her interpretation is that of a woman living with HIV.Peggy left holes in the timeline so that YOU can add an event, a decision, a death that affected you. Please use the Post-It notes on the shelves opposite to jot down the what could be added, and please include the year. 

Happy Place

My Happy Place, 2022
Artist: Penny Bradford
Materials: paper
Penny Bradford loves being surrounded by flowers in her garden so was inspired to create her story on a page. She's a gardener, which you can see by the flowers. She loves having lots of flowers around her and always has flowers in her home. Penny was diagnosed in ‘92 and at that time there were no medicines.

Stormy Days and Rainbows

Stormy Days and Rainbows
Artist: Dawn Clouthier
Material: Stained Glass
Dawn Cloutier creates works of art in stained glass, usually at her home studio. At the women’s arts-based research event, she brought her materials and created these two images about living with HIV.

Light through the trees

Light Through the Trees, 2022
Artist: Denise Wozniak
Material: photograph
 Denise Wozniak was born in England. She was infected with HIV in 1989 but only learned her diagnosis in 1994, when her nine-month-old baby daughter became sick and died.
Denise is a speaker on "Changing Mindsets from Surviving To Thriving." She is also a TEDx speaker on the power of photography as a means of recovery after being diagnosed with PTSD.

Full Blown AIDS Collage

Just Another Day with Full Blown AIDS
Artist: Kath Webster
Material: paper and photographs of an original relief piece.
Kath Webster worked with materials from a 4x4 foot collaborative collage she did in the early years with Margarite Sanchez, another positive woman artist. The original piece depicts their journeys as they supported one another through late-stage AIDS. In 1997 triple combination therapy become available and they both achieved ‘undetectable’ viral loads. However; it was still a time of great uncertainty about whether or not they would survive long-term. The creative process was a means to deal with the myriad of emotions they experienced during this time. The harsh reality of the diagnosis and illnesses are depicted along with strength, resilience and dark humour – which they both found to be an essential coping strategy.The idea to make the original collage came while Margarite was lying in a hospital bed battling opportunistic infections thinking “holy fuck somehow this needs to be art.”

Full Blown AIDS Poem

Just Another Day with Full Blown AIDS
Artist: Kath Webster
Material: paper and photographs of an original relief piece.

Why Me Painting

Why Me, Why Not Me? 2022
Artist: Charlene Anderson
Materials: paint and canvas

Why Me Poem

Why Me, Why Not Me?
2022
Artist: Charlene Anderson
Materials: paint and canvas