Corporate Sponsor Spotlight: Giulio Recchioni from the Italian Cultural Centre

Corporate Sponsor Spotlight: Giulio Recchioni from the Italian Cultural Centre

Giulio Recchioni

Can you tell us how the Italian Cultural Centre first got involved with The Cultch?

Our very first time at The Cultch was in March 2012 with FRESCO, a play the Italian Cultural Centre commissioned from Lucia Frangione and BellaLuna Productions, telling the lesser known story of the internment of Italian citizens in Canada during WW2.

However the first proper partnership with The Cultch was in May 2017 with LA MERDA, featuring a naked Silvia Gallerano sitting on a stool on a dark stage… what a tough show that was!

What has surprised you and your colleagues most about partnering with The Cultch?

I was surprised by the richness and diversification of the shows offered at The Cultch, and also by the number of people that created a community around this historical institution in Vancouver;  some of the audience changes according to what’s playing, but there is also a hard core audience that comes to every show. I think that’s great. They trust The Cultch, they know whatever gets put on stage will be good and will have an impact on them, and they come with an open mind.

Over the years, the Italian Cultural Centre has supported several Cultch shows. Are there any highlights or memorable moments?

I still can’t help but smile when I think of Pss Pss and what they did with the ladder. Pss Pss was a funny show by Compagnia Baccalà that made adults and children laugh with non-verbal humour. In our line of work, cross-generational and cross-cultural are adjectives we use constantly, but this show brilliantly embodied both concepts.

How important do you think it is that the arts organizations continue to cultivate and sustain partnerships with corporate sponsors and local businesses?

It’s of paramount importance. The population is growing in this expensive city, and we are also seeing the consequential multiplication of cultural and artistic organizations. Often putting up cultural activities costs more money than ticket sales can generate, and government grants (municipal, provincial, federal) do not always keep up with the growing demand for funds. I hope more and more thriving businesses will want to share some of their wealth with the local community to keep this city interesting and interested.

What are you curious about right now?

I am curious about the new Creative City Strategy that the City will be rolling out – hopefully soon. There have been a number of explorative meetings to get an idea of what is needed in the arts and culture sector, and I can’t wait to see how all that knowledge will convert into an action plan.

Do you have a favorite show?

This is always such an unfair question… I see a decent number of shows throughout the year, and I have to constantly update my list of favourites. If I had to single out something I saw recently, though – I am a jazz fan, and I was lucky enough to go to Pyatt Hall for the live concert of the great baritone sax player, Gary Smulyan, with strings. He is a powerhouse!


As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today! Contact Natalie Schneck, Development Associate: natalie@thecultch.com; 604.251.1766 x.121
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001

Donor Spotlight: Jamie Evrard

Donor Spotlight with Jamie Evrard

Jamie, you have been long-time supporter of The Cultch.  Can you tell us how you first got involved with the organization?

I’ve been involved with the Cultch since 1978 when I moved to Vancouver and sold my weaving at the Circle Craft Christmas Market which was then held there. I’ve always been intrigued by and attended many of the Cultch’s offerings so when I realized I had enough money to begin giving back to Vancouver in some way the Cultch was an obvious choice.  It is a real community theatre and supports so many smaller local theatre groups as well as international performers. I went to a Peggy Baker show way back and I met a filmmaker/photographer, who asked me if he could photograph my hands for one of his projects. The Cultch is a place where this kind of connection can happen. It’s intimate and you’ll always talk to people.

What has surprised you most about working/partnering with The Cultch?

The fun of getting to know so many of the people who work at and give to the Cultch. Being able to attend special events and actually see works in progress and meet their creators.

You’ve built an admirable and remarkable career as a visual artist both in Canada and internationally. What do you find interesting about supporting the other artistic disciplines such as theatre and dance? 

I believe that a vibrant arts scene is essential for a great city so I’d like to help make Vancouver more exciting. Great theatre adds color to life, that can’t hurt!

Does seeing theatre and dance inform your own artistic work? 

You know I saw Jane Heyman’s version of “Three Sisters” by Chekhov in 2013, and I’m not saying that it informed my work directly, but there was something about that piece. Jane and I often talk about the creative process and one day she saw a painting hanging upside down in my studio and I confessed that I often work this way to be able to better see the shapes and forms I’m creating.  She told me sometime later that she was experimenting with rehearsing her theatre pieces starting at the end.

It’s hard to be an artist of any age, from being a small child to an older person. I think just seeing people making and performing art is inspiring in itself.  I like that you guys do risky work.

Can you tell us what you wish other people knew about The Cultch?

Giving to the Cultch is a great way to feel a part of artistic creation and giving money away is one of the most fun things you can do. Its fun to support artistic creation and it’s easier and more possible to become a donor then a lot of people think. The Cultch is a place you can make a difference, it is small enough so that every donation counts and it’s a cool community of vibrant artists.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about donating to The Cultch but hasn’t made the move yet? 

It is an exciting organization to be inside of.  The Cultch has lots of outreach programs for kids and people who would otherwise  not be able to attend theatre. Also, donor events , like the director’s circle receptions before shows are a lot of fun.

You have got a great aesthetic sensibility in many areas, Jamie (I love your style!) Can you tell us where you look to for inspiration?

I’m inspired by the work of other artists I see when I travel, and the work of local artists including many of those in Bau Xi Gallery. Also by solitary confinement and boredom—my time in Italy where life is simpler.  As Einstein said, “creativity is a residue of time wasted”.   You know last night, I came back from San Francisco and I had to go into the studio – I had to work. The phone rang and I didn’t answer.  Sometimes you gotta be ruthless to be creative.  These days we are offered all this free stuff on social media but really it takes away something of incredible value – our time—so I don’t do any of it.

What are you curious about?

People. I love hearing people’s stories and everybody has a story to tell if you ask which I often do.  Stories well told are universally engaging, and theatre is the best way to tell them.  And the Yucatán! My next trip.

 

 

Jamie Evrard’s Upcoming Exhibition:

Bau-Xi Gallery

March 3-17, 2018
3045 Granville Street, Vancouver

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 3, 2:00 – 4:00pm

 

 

 


As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today! Contact Natalie Schneck, Development Associate: natalie@thecultch.com; 604.251.1766 x.121
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001