A few staff picks for the 2017/ 2018 season!

A few staff picks for the 2017/ 2018 season!

We interrupt you’re summer shenanigans to remind you that before you know it autumn will be here…okay, okay, pipe down with the booing! Though, it may be difficult to think about autumn just yet, we wish to remind you about all the exciting shows coming up in our 17/18 season!

Check out a few of the shows our staff just can’t wait for:

Name: Lisa Mennell

Job Title: Communications Associate

17/18 Season Pick: Goblin Market (Oct 3-14, 2017)

Why: I love poetry and I love circus! This show is based on the narrative poem, Goblin Market by 19th century poet Christina Rossetti. The visuals for this sexy -adult only- circus show are stunning, and I hear that it melds story and athleticism flawlessly. Incredible acrobatic feats combined with classic poetry…what is not to like?!

Name: Elysse Cheadle

Job Title: Head Front of House Manager and Volunteer Coordinator

17/18 Season Pick: Black Boys (Jan 16-20, 2018)

Why: I have been obsessed with Toronto-based Buddies in Bad Times Theatre since I saw their production ‘Obaaberima’ here two years ago. I still get chills thinking about that performance – every element felt so alive and necessary in the telling of their story. Black Boys brings the return of the incomparable Tawiah M’carthy (of ‘Obaaberima’). We are so lucky to welcome back a performer of his calibre to our theatre! I expect ‘Black Boys’ to bring ferocity, humour, honesty, sex, and humanity. What more could you want?

Head Front of House Manager & Volunteer Coordinator, Elysse Cheadle

 

Black Boys runs Jan 16-20. Stephen Jackman-Torkoff, Tawiah Ben M’Carthy and Thomas Olajide by Tanja-Tiziana.

Name: Natalie Schneck

Job Title: Development Associate

17/18 Season Pick: Dublin Oldschool (Jan 30 – Feb 3)

Why: It’s an Irish two hander with DJ tunes and re-connections. It seems gritty and real. I look forward to being invited into a world far away from my own but with (hopefully) some relatable elements.

Single tickets for the 17/18 season are now on saleBook a subscription save to up to 25%!

Portraits in Motion: “A gentle and thoughtful reflection about the fleeting nature of the moment…”

Portraits in Motion: “A gentle and thoughtful reflection about the fleeting nature of the moment…”

We are thrilled to partner with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival to co-present Portraits in Motion. Back by popular demand, Volker Gerling’s unique flipbook-cinema presentation shares the stories and images of the people he encountered while walking over 3,000 miles around Germany. Portraits in Motion will run January 24-26 at the York Theatre.

Volker Gerling on the Development of Portraits in Motion:

During my time as a student of film at the Academy, I understood that my passion was not for the big screen movie or television, but for a very special small form of film I called photograph flipbook cinema. In my flipbook films I mainly work with documentary portraits of people. The 36 images that my films are made of would run by in about one and a half seconds of ordinary cinema or television, but in a flipbook movie they can be repeated at will, you can see the gaps between them, and you can unconsciously try to fill these gaps. In this form, these pictures gain their own very unusual power and poetry.

Photo credit: Susanne Schüle

 

In summer 2002, I took an old wooden kitchen tray and made it into a simple hawker’s tray. There was room for six flipbooks on it. I hung a sign on it, saying: “Please visit my traveling exhibition. I walked through the city of Berlin and showed people my flipbook movies. Sometimes I changed the programme. I screwed an empty honey jar underneath the hawker’s tray so that visitors could pay a symbolic exit fee.

After I had been showing my flipbook cinemas in this way for almost a year, I came to realise that people have a need for “small” and “simple” stories. I decided to travel. I wanted to know how people outside the city would react to my films. I wanted to make new flipbook movies. I bought myself a new pair of walking boots and set off. I did not want to miss anything along the way, so I chose to go slow, on foot. I took my hawker’s tray with me and showed my flipbook movies to people by the wayside and over their garden fences. In the evenings, I went into pubs and restaurants and I visited village parties. I did not take any money with me. I slept in my tent and lived only from whatever people gave me. Sometimes they gave me money as a symbolic fee when they had seen my small show of flipbook cinemas, or they often gave me something to eat.

My journeys are reminiscent of the days when cinema itself was itinerant, when projectionists would move from town to town and there were no movie theatres. My own form of wandering cinema also creates a link between the ways in which my films are seen and my own way of travelling. The rhythms and the sense of time are comparable – just as visitors to my flipbook movies can view them at their own speed, my walking is based on my own rhythm and speed.

In my flipbooks, I am interested in the gaps between the images and everything that gets lost when you leaf through them quickly, and when I am walking I am interested in the gaps between the cities that you would normally speedily cover by car, train or plane. I am interested in what happens by the wayside; whatever you can never see when you travel quickly. I am interested in the people I meet when I am on my way. What are their lives like? What is important for them? What stories do they tell me, the stranger? How do the people in all the different towns, gardens and villages I pass through react to my art?

Today I can look back at 3,000 miles of walking, mainly in Germany, and nearly a year on the road in total spread across more than 10 years. Again and again I experience the excitement and the surprises of setting off without knowing what will happen next. I remain true to the principle of my very first walk – I take no money. I finance my journeys by showing my flipbook cinemas that I carry on my hawker’s tray. Old faces and old stories lead me to new faces and new stories. My exhibition is renewed.

In 2005, I began to show my flipbook movies in a stage show, Portraits in Motion. On stage, I use a video camera to project my movies onto a big screen. For a brief moment, the people in my flipbooks come to life. They are so real that sometimes you feel you have known the people in them for years. I tell their stories and tell of my own big, small, serious and bizarre encounters. My show is a gentle and thoughtful reflection about the fleeting nature of the moment and what it means when people meet each other. 

Every year I walk, so every year my show develops at the leisurely pace of a walker.

Volker Gerling

Portraits in Motion runs Jan 24-26, 2017 at the York Theatre. Tickets from $20. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363

Century Song: Five reasons you need to see this groundbreaking show

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 Century Song, presented with the PuSh Performing Arts Festival, is one of the most unique shows of The Cultch’s 15/16 season! The multimedia show provides a thrilling look at 100 years in black  history from a women`s perspective. The piece, a “music recital” study of ephemeral aspects of the Black Canadian experience over the past century, is completely wordless. The story is a survey from servitude to sexuality; pop culture to protest. Here are five reasons you should watch this groundbreaking piece of art. For an interactive experience click here.

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  1. Black History Month:  With February being Black History Month, Century Song provides a great opportunity for  Vancouver audiences to educate themselves, from a Black woman’s perspective, about Canadian Black history. Here’s what Ross Manson, Director of Century Song, says about this dynamic, “I learned the distinction between white and black feminism in my research into the 1970s. White feminism called for equality. Black feminism called for justice. The difference is vast. In short – I learned that as a country there is much under the surface of our history that most of us aren’t aware of. And so the question formed: why does what is taught in our schools omit so much?_MG_7652
  2.  Modern Dance: Neema Bickersteth and choreographer Kate Alton (Dora Award winner and K. M. Hunter award winner) co-created a unique body of modern dance movement featured heavily in Century Song. Alton creates thought-provoking, emotionally engaging theatrical dances that are as much explorations of the mind as of the body, working with writers, directors, and vocal coaches to develop inter-disciplinary performance works that pack an intellectual and emotional punch._MG_7774C
  3. Classical Music: The performance utilizes the UBC Opera-trained and Dora Nominated Neema Bickersteth on vocalise (wordless vocals) and music by some of the past 100 years’ most adventurous composers– 1912: Sergei Rachmaninoff (Russia); 1935: Olivier Messaien (France); 1950: John Cage (USA); 1978: Georges Aperghis (Greece); 2012: Reza Jacobs (Canada); 2016: Piano, Gregory Oh (Canada) and 2016: Percussion, Computers, Composition, Music Co-Direction, Debashis Sinha (Canada)._MG_6798C2
  4.  Innovative Video: The show’s projections were made by Germany’s fettFilm known for their innovative video production. By combining video with other media the video artists Momme Hinrichs and Torge Möller primarily create multifaceted works of art which do not merely decorate the stage or coexist with it but instead blend various artistic levels.They develop and realise their ideas, from the initial stage to the final presentation, in close cooperation with directors and artists. For amazing video of the performance click here. _MG_7291 - Copy
  5. Internationally Acclaimed Theatre Company:  Century Song has been developed by the Toronto-based, international award-winning performance company, Volcano Theatre, in partnership with Crooked Figure Dances, and the Moveable Beast Collective with direction by Dora Award-winning director Ross Manson. “One of those companies that every great theatre city needs – bold, experimental, and bubbling with ideas.” – Toronto Star

Century Song is at The Cultch’s  Historic Theatre until February 6. Tickets are from $20. Get your tickets here.

Images:  Photos of Neema Bickersteth by John Lauener

5 Reasons You Should See The Fish Eyes Trilogy!

We’re very fortunate this week to be presenting The Fish Eyes Trilogy as part of the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival. This trilogy has been growing and evolving for 11 years and is an extremely powerful one-woman show.

However if you’re not sure about what to expect, here are a few reasons why you should come down:

1) The Local Aspect

Local art in any community is important; supporting local artists ensures that local art can continue to grow. Even though she’s a national sensation now, Anita Majumdar is a local artist who is returning home. Growing up in Port Moody and was a part of the inspiration for writing this play. This, along with the show being presented as part of the PuSh Festival gives The Fish Eyes Trilogy an incredibly strong connection to our community. The greatest thing that can happen with art is for one generation of local artists to inspire the next to ensure that it remains alive and strong.
The Fish Eyes Trilogy

2) Back By Popular Demand!

After being written in 2004 for a final project in school, Fish Eyes made its Vancouver debut at The Cultch back in 2006. It has been growing ever since, most noticeably with the addition of part 2 (Boys With Cars) and part 3 (Let Me Borrow That Top).

No two productions of a show are ever the same, even when the show has been performed by the same person for 11 years. This is a chance to not only see how the show has changed and evolved over the years, but how the actress has grown as well.

 

3) The Power of Dance

The beauty of The Fish Eyes Trilogy comes from the brilliant dancing that is showcased by Ms. Majumdar. From classical Indian to contemporary Bollywood, the grace and movement displayed is not only a treat for the eyes, but is also integral in telling the stories. A bond is developed between the audience and the three different characters, as the dancing that they practice is put on display.

4) A Show Everyone Can Relate To

It would be impossible to watch The Fish Eyes Trilogy without being able to connect with Meena, Naz, or Candice in some way. In their daily lives of growing up and going to school, they experience challenges that are very universal.

Meena faces the problem of having to choose between pursuing her desire to dance or her dream of having friends, and her crush on the most popular boy in school. Her dedication to dancing has essentially forced her into being an outsider, and makes her wonder if she should abandon what she has, for what she wants.

Naz is a girl who in some ways is the opposite of Meena. She made the choice to stop dancing in order to have more of a social life and a boyfriend. Unfortunately, she is finding out the grass is not necessarily greener on the other side. Naz needs to find a way to make her peace with the decision she’s made.

Candice is the popular girl who seems to have it all, but can’t have what she really wants. She lives in a world that demands she stays the same, not being able to pursue her dream of being a Bollywood dancer. She’s not allowed to show that there is something she truly cares for without leaving the realm popularity that she is in. Candice has to decide if the pressures of society and her friends are enough to keep her away from what she wants.

 

5) The Name’s the Thing

The biggest draw for The Fish Eyes Trilogy is Anita herself. Her natural talent and years of experience have shaped her into one of Canada’s top performers. Since graduating from UBC and the National theatre school, she has written, acted and danced all across the country. She’s appeared in film and television while still maintaining a high number of brilliant stage shows. She is an award-winning artist and her career and skills continue to grow. There’s no telling where she’ll end up, so why miss an opportunity to see her now?

FishEyes-portrait
The Fish Eyes Trilogy runs until January 31 at the Historic Theatre. The show runs on alternating nights. Tickets start from $19 and are available on our website or by calling the box office at 604-251-1363.