The Daisy Theatre has returned to The Cultch!

The Daisy Theatre has returned to The Cultch!

After three sold out runs, the popular marionette production has returned to The Cultch. The Daisy Theatre celebrated its opening yesterday at The Historic Theatre and will run until April 9.

10 things you should know about The Daisy Theatre:

  1. The name “Daisy Theatre” comes from “Daisie”- puppet shows staged in Czechoslovakia during World War II, which were banned by the Nazi-regime.
  2. Every single show is unscripted and partly improvised. So every performance will be different.
  3. The story is dark and sometimes disturbing, but always ridiculous!
  4. Ronnie Burkett’s company consists of over 40 marionettes.
  5. This puppet show is not for kids!
  6. Ronnie Burkett formed his Theatre of Marionettes in 1986.
  7. The Daisy Theatre is “Ronnie unleashed”- a show which is completely different than his last shows with monologues and songs, but without an established script.
  8. Esme Massengill, Mrs. Edna Rural and the fairy child Schnitzel are some of the audiences favourite characters.
  9. The show celebrated its premiere in 2013 and enthused thousand of visitors since then.
  10. The Province calls it “Some of the funniest, most brilliant theatre you’ll ever be lucky enough to see”.

 

We are so excited about the show, and The Daisy Theatre has also obviously infected others with enthusiasm :

“His characters are the stuff of BRILLIANT sketch comedy…the puppets vibrate with life, even though the audience can see Burkett the entire time.” – Andrea Warner, The Georgia Straight

“This is a UNIQUE and CHEEKY form of live stage entertainment that honours and propels the dissident and mutinous roots from which it hath so richly grown” – Baird Blackstone, Broken Leg Reviews

 

The Daisy Theatre runs from March 21 to April 9 at The Historic Theatre. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.  Ask the box office about our “see it twice price.” For ages 19+

Partnering with Rosedale on Robson

Here at The Cultch, we not only want to give our patrons the best experience possible but we also want to ensure that all the artists who perform here thoroughly enjoy themselves.

Since 2001, our hotel partner Rosedale on Robson has helped us achieve this. Visiting artists, such as Ronnie Burkett or Bob Kingdom, are assured of a comfortable environment while they stay in Vancouver. Jodi Sprackman, the Director of Community Relations shared some thoughts about Rosedale’s history and its partnership with The Cultch.

Can you tell us a little bit about the Rosedale on Robson and its history?

The Rosedale is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year! We opened our doors on April 2, 1995 at the corner of Hamilton and Robson Streets even before the area became known as a haven for arts and sports enthusiasts.

As an all-suite hotel, we offer a selection of spacious one and two-bedroom suites that provide the comforts of home, including a fully equipped kitchenette and a separate living room. Artists love to stay with us because of these features, as well as our ideal location (we are in close proximity to a variety of theatres), and our friendly Guest Services Team.

Because artists tour so frequently, they really appreciate having a larger than average hotel room with a kitchen; essentially a place that feels like home.

As The Cultch’s hotel partner, is supporting the arts something that is important to you?

We’re passionate about supporting and promoting the arts in our community.

We’ve been a sponsor of a variety of cultural organizations and festivals of all sizes over the years that include dance, music, literature, comedy, and of course, theatre. We’re committed to playing a part in helping to enrich our cultural community.

Can you tell us a bit about the Rosedale’s role in supporting The Cultch? How did this partnership take shape?

The Cultch is an integral element of the arts community, and our partnership helps foster the commitment the Rosedale has to the overall promotion of culture and the arts in Vancouver. We greatly value our long-standing relationship with The Cultch; this is our 13th year as its hotel sponsor. We love welcoming The Cultch’s artists to the Rosedale!

 

Rosedale on Robson is located at 838 Hamilton Street.  If you know someone who wants to visit Vancouver and needs a comfortable place to stay, have them check in at Rosedale on Robson!

Great Reviews for Elbow Room Café: The Musical

Great Reviews for Elbow Room Café: The Musical

Zee Zee Theatre’s Elbow Room Café: The Musical celebrated its opening on March 2 and was an unqualified success! We had an amazing evening with lots of fun!  It seems we aren’t the only ones this musical has infected with joy – take a look at these reviews and get infected with the Elbow Room Café fever!

Photo credit: Tina Krueger Kulic

“Elbow Room Café: The Musical is simply the most JOYFUL, LOVING, FUNNY show to hit the York Stage.” – Jo Ledingham

“It’s a play that is endearing, heartwarming, uproariously funny, sweet, sassy and just PLAIN FUN!” – Monika Forberger, Entertainment Vancouver

“Underneath the belly laughs and social commentary, this love letter to Vancouver is FULL OH HEART” – Carly Whetter, Vancouver Magazine 

“It is tough not to adore this HEARTFELT TRIBUTE.” – Mark Robins, Vancouver Presents

“Perhaps it’s the nostalgia, the familiarity, and the comfort that so touches the audience, much like Elbow Room Café itself.” – Ljudmila Petrovic, Sad Mag

“Anton Lipovetsky’s WONDERFUL MUSIC and lyrics were so memorable. I’ll be humming along for the next few days.” – Lauren Chancellor, The Reviews Weekly

“Elbow Room Café is a LITTLE PIECE OF JOY.” – Ed Vaughan-Hughes, Daily Hive

If you are interested in reading more reviews or you want to know how this show has developed, check out Broken Leg Reviews,  Review Vancouver and Artslandia.

Photo credit: Tina Krueger Kulic

Elbow Room Café: The Musical runs from Mar 1 – 12, 2017 in the York Theatre. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Get 15% off your food bill at the real Elbow Room Café (560 Davie St) when you show your Elbow Room Café: The Musical ticket stub!

Photo credit: Tina Krueger Kulic

“Elbow Room Café: The Musical” opens at the York Theatre March 2

Elbow Room Café: The Musical opens at the York Theatre March 2

Elbow Room Café: The Musical will celebrate its opening on March 2 in the York Theatre and will run until March 12.

Elbow Room Cafe: The Musical is a candid look inside Vancouver’s most iconic eatery The Elbow Room Cafe. Known for its raucous service, celebrity sightings, and hearts of gold, the musical will feature everything you love about Vancouver’s favourite “abuse restaurant.”  You can look forward to a healthy serving of beloved owners Patrice (Allan Zinyk) and Bryan (David M. Adams), the crazy antics of hung-over bachelorette-party guests, flashy drag queens, and lots and lots and lots of love.

“Playwright Dave Deveau and composer Anton Lipovetsky pay homage to downtown Vancouver’s legendary breakfast spot, famed as much for its food as for the sarcastic service.”  – The Georgia Straight

The Elbow Room Cafe on Davie St. has been an local favourite for over three decades. Opened in 1983 by Patrick Savoie and Bryan Searle, it has become know for being an “abuse restaurant” – one of those fun places to go to to get a little witty banter with your breakfast.

The real Elbow Room Cafe, 560 Davie St. – The inspiration for Zee Zee Theatre’s new musical

We are really excited, and it seems we are not the only ones! Elbow Room Cafe: The Musical is one of The Georgia Straight’s “spring picks”  featured in the Spring Arts Preview. Kathleen Oliver  says the draw of the show is it’s “Sassy irreverence, which creators [Anton] Lipovetsky, and [Dave] Deveau, and director Cameron Mackenzie have proven they can dish out in generous portions.”

Not only did Elbow Room Cafe: The Musical get a mention in the spring picks, it was also featured as the cover story! “You know, the place is chaotic and rhythmic and colourful and gaudy and loud. It immediately sort of lends itself to the form.” says Dave Deaveau in the article by Alexander Varty , stating why they chose to create a musical about the local restaurant.

A couple Cultch staff display the Georgia Straight cover featuring Elbow Room Cafe: The Musical

If you’re interested in hearing a little more about how this show has developed, check out this great interview with Dave Deveau and Cameron Mackenzie on Roundhouse Radio’s Janice and Corey. And if you’re a foodie, make sure you check out CKNW’s Food Glorious Food. The Podcast hosts Richard Wolak and Zahra Alani share their enthusiasm for Elbow Room Cafe: The Musical.

“After a remarkable 34-year run, Vancouver’s most deliciously theatrical experience is finally taking the stage.” The Georgia Straight

Zee Zee Theatre Playwright Dave Deveau, and actors Allan Zinyk and David M. Adams on the cover of The Georgia Straight

Get 15% off your food bill at the real Elbow Room Café (560 Davie St) when you show your Elbow Room Café: The Musical ticket stub!

Elbow Room Café: The Musical runs at The York Theatre, 639 Commercial Drive, from March 1 – 12. Tickets are available online, by phone at 604.251.1361, or in person at 1895 Venables St.

The Cultch would like to thank our Production Sponsor -TD Bank, and our Community Partner – Qmunity.

Rental availability at The Cultch!

Check out our 2017 rental availability by clicking the image above

The Cultch is a supportive rental facility for dozens of local performing arts and community groups. Last year alone, we welcomed 79 different companies who hosted 99 different events. All together they put on 267 performances plus 119 days of rehearsal! Companies who have called The Cultch home include Blackbird Theatre, the Vancouver Fringe Festival, Unpintheair Theatre, Standing Wave, the Talking Stick Festival, and Touchstone Theatre. We have also been host to dozens of meetings and conferences, book launches, lectures, and play readings, and even a wedding! Check out our rental availability above or email rentals@thecultch.com or call 604.251.1766 x. 107 for more information.

Thank you for making Mouthpiece a huge success!

Thank you for making Mouthpiece a huge success!

The reception that Mouthpiece has received is incredible! We were so thrilled to be able to bring Quote Unquote Collective to Vancouver to present their amazing show. Mouthpiece is a powerful piece of theatre that portrays one woman (played by two women- Amy Nostbakken and Norah Sadava) as she struggles to find her voice in the wake of her mother’s death. If you were lucky enough to manage to get tickets to this SOLD-OUT HIT, then we want to thank you for spreading the word and making this show the amazing success that it is.

 

We would also like to acknowledge the amazing support of our community partner for Mouthpiece, West Coast Leaf. For each show presented at The Cultch we try to find a matching community partner – A company with a similar mandate, and with similar values. West Coast Leaf has been an amazing community partner and we are so grateful for all their work helping us get the word out for Mouthpiece. If you haven’t heard about West Coast Leaf and their amazing work in the community, we recommend that you check them out. “[Their] goal is to achieve equality by changing historic patterns of systemic discrimination against women through BC-based equality rights litigation, law reform, and education.”

Our Community Partners for Mouthpiece – West Coast Leaf. Jessica Lithwick, Clea Parfitt, and Robyn Trask pose with The Cultch’s Executive Director, Heather Redfern. Photo Credit – roaming-the-planet

Mouthpiece is a part of Femme February at The Cultch. For the whole month of February we are presenting shows and events created by women. Now more than ever we think it is important to promote the things we believe in, and so all month long, events at The Cultch will highlight the strength and power of the female voice and experience. We couldn’t do these kind of things without the generous support of our sponsors, donors, community partners and our patrons. So thank you everyone -we truly couldn’t do it without you!

We especially want to thank Charlotte and Sonya Wall. It is their generous support that has made Femme February possible, and we are so grateful.

Heather Redfern poses with Femme February sponsors, The Walls, at the opening night reception for Mouthpiece. Photo Credit – Ric Lam

If you weren’t able to get tickets to Mouthpiece (and even if you were!), consider checking out some of the other events coming up for Femme February. NeoIndigenA (Feb 15-19), Women in the Arts Panel Discussion & Girl Positive Book Launch (Feb 9 – FREE EVENT), and am a (Feb 21- March 4)

Femme February runs all February long at the Historic Theatre and the Vancity Culture Lab. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363

Breaking News: The Cultch Receives Funding Through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Breaking News: The Cultch Receives Funding Through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

The Cultch would like to thank the Department of Canadian Heritage for their support through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund to support the purchase of specialized equipment.

“The Vancouver East Cultural Centre is extremely excited to receive this support from the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund. This funding enables us to make some necessary upgrades to our facilities and technology so we can better serve the multiple communities that partake in performance at Cultch venues. Audiences, artists and other users will all benefit from the upgraded ticketing system, and the theatrical equipment will go a long way in ensuring the Cultch can continue to support and present the best of local, national and international performance and community-based programs. We are grateful to the Government of Canada for showing leadership and commitment by investing in our community through the arts, and we encourage all levels of government to follow this enlightened example.”—Heather Redfern, Executive Director, Vancouver East Cultural Centre

Managing Director, Cindy Reid, gives address to media and audience in the Vancity Culture Lab

 

Excerpt from Department of Canadian Heritage News Release:

The Government of Canada provides support for cultural infrastructure through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

January 27, 2017 – Vancouver – Department of Canadian Heritage

The Vancouver East Cultural Centre, a multidisciplinary arts presenter known locally as the Cultch, is receiving $239,263 from the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund to support the purchase of specialized equipment. The Honourable Hedy Fry, Member of Parliament (Vancouver Centre), announced this investment today on behalf of the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage.

Funding will be used to purchase and install new audio, video and lighting equipment and related hardware for the Cultch’s venues. It will also support the purchase of new ticketing, venue and event management software. This specialized equipment will allow the Cultch to increase the variety of its performances, while enhancing its technical capacity.

“Supporting cultural infrastructure is paramount for the growth and vitality of our communities and artists. Our government is proud to invest in the Vancouver East Cultural Centre as it continues to support our artists and contribute to the development of Canadian music, dance and theatre.” —The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage

“The Vancouver East Cultural Centre has been a cultural and artistic hub in the Lower Mainland for more than 40 years. I am delighted that this investment will allow the Cultch to continue to entertain audiences with exciting and innovative programming for years to come.” —The Honourable Hedy Fry, Member of Parliament (Vancouver Centre)

Quick Facts

  • The Cultch opened in 1973 at the Historic Theatre on Venables Street in east Vancouver. It has grown significantly in recent years and also now operates the VanCity Culture Lab, Jim Green House and the recently renovated York Theatre.
  • The Cultch offers programming in theatre, dance, music and the visual arts, featuring artists from across Canada and around the world.
  • The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund program seeks to improve physical conditions for artistic creativity and arts presentation or exhibition. It is also designed to increase access for Canadians to performing, visual, and media arts, and to museum collections and heritage displays.

Portraits in Motion: “A gentle and thoughtful reflection about the fleeting nature of the moment…”

Portraits in Motion: “A gentle and thoughtful reflection about the fleeting nature of the moment…”

We are thrilled to partner with PuSh International Performing Arts Festival to co-present Portraits in Motion. Back by popular demand, Volker Gerling’s unique flipbook-cinema presentation shares the stories and images of the people he encountered while walking over 3,000 miles around Germany. Portraits in Motion will run January 24-26 at the York Theatre.

Volker Gerling on the Development of Portraits in Motion:

During my time as a student of film at the Academy, I understood that my passion was not for the big screen movie or television, but for a very special small form of film I called photograph flipbook cinema. In my flipbook films I mainly work with documentary portraits of people. The 36 images that my films are made of would run by in about one and a half seconds of ordinary cinema or television, but in a flipbook movie they can be repeated at will, you can see the gaps between them, and you can unconsciously try to fill these gaps. In this form, these pictures gain their own very unusual power and poetry.

Photo credit: Susanne Schüle

 

In summer 2002, I took an old wooden kitchen tray and made it into a simple hawker’s tray. There was room for six flipbooks on it. I hung a sign on it, saying: “Please visit my traveling exhibition. I walked through the city of Berlin and showed people my flipbook movies. Sometimes I changed the programme. I screwed an empty honey jar underneath the hawker’s tray so that visitors could pay a symbolic exit fee.

After I had been showing my flipbook cinemas in this way for almost a year, I came to realise that people have a need for “small” and “simple” stories. I decided to travel. I wanted to know how people outside the city would react to my films. I wanted to make new flipbook movies. I bought myself a new pair of walking boots and set off. I did not want to miss anything along the way, so I chose to go slow, on foot. I took my hawker’s tray with me and showed my flipbook movies to people by the wayside and over their garden fences. In the evenings, I went into pubs and restaurants and I visited village parties. I did not take any money with me. I slept in my tent and lived only from whatever people gave me. Sometimes they gave me money as a symbolic fee when they had seen my small show of flipbook cinemas, or they often gave me something to eat.

My journeys are reminiscent of the days when cinema itself was itinerant, when projectionists would move from town to town and there were no movie theatres. My own form of wandering cinema also creates a link between the ways in which my films are seen and my own way of travelling. The rhythms and the sense of time are comparable – just as visitors to my flipbook movies can view them at their own speed, my walking is based on my own rhythm and speed.

In my flipbooks, I am interested in the gaps between the images and everything that gets lost when you leaf through them quickly, and when I am walking I am interested in the gaps between the cities that you would normally speedily cover by car, train or plane. I am interested in what happens by the wayside; whatever you can never see when you travel quickly. I am interested in the people I meet when I am on my way. What are their lives like? What is important for them? What stories do they tell me, the stranger? How do the people in all the different towns, gardens and villages I pass through react to my art?

Today I can look back at 3,000 miles of walking, mainly in Germany, and nearly a year on the road in total spread across more than 10 years. Again and again I experience the excitement and the surprises of setting off without knowing what will happen next. I remain true to the principle of my very first walk – I take no money. I finance my journeys by showing my flipbook cinemas that I carry on my hawker’s tray. Old faces and old stories lead me to new faces and new stories. My exhibition is renewed.

In 2005, I began to show my flipbook movies in a stage show, Portraits in Motion. On stage, I use a video camera to project my movies onto a big screen. For a brief moment, the people in my flipbooks come to life. They are so real that sometimes you feel you have known the people in them for years. I tell their stories and tell of my own big, small, serious and bizarre encounters. My show is a gentle and thoughtful reflection about the fleeting nature of the moment and what it means when people meet each other. 

Every year I walk, so every year my show develops at the leisurely pace of a walker.

Volker Gerling

Portraits in Motion runs Jan 24-26, 2017 at the York Theatre. Tickets from $20. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363

Reviews are in for The Fighting Season…and they are Great!

Reviews are in for The Fighting Season…and they are Great!

Photo by Javier R. Sotres

Last Wednesday we opened The Fighting Season, our first show of 2017, and the winner of the 2015 Cultchivating the Fringe Award. What a way to start!  We are SO happy with the response it has been getting.

The Fighting Season is a deeply poignant play that delves into the heart of the Afghan war through the perspective of three Canadian medical personnel. The play examines the experiences of an OR surgeon, a medic, and a nurse as they deal with their experiences in Afghanistan. The Fighting Season addresses three of the many ways people deal with PTSD, and is partially based on the experiences of local playwright Sean Harris Oliver’s father who was an OR surgeon  in Afghanistan.

The reviews are unanimous, The Fighting Season is not to miss!

“Theatrical make-believe has rarely felt more VISCERAL.” – Jerry Wasserman, The Vancouver Sun

“The performances under the direction of Evan Frayne are uniformly TERRIFIC.”- Mark Robins, Vancouver Presents

“The play feels excruciatingly real and scrupulously HONEST…it’s a powerful piece of theatre made even more potent by three SUPERB performances.” – Jo Ledingham, joledingham.ca

“Visceral and MOVING, The Fighting Season shines as a FASCINATING study of war medics.” – Lauren Chancellor, TheReviewweekly

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The Fighting Season is selling fast! Don’t miss it, get your tickets.

The Fighting Season runs until Jan 21, 2016 in the Vancity Culture Lab. Tickets are $35. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363

Femme February at The Cultch

Femme February at The Cultch

This February, The Cultch presents a showcase of powerful work by trailblazing female artists. Celebrate the strength and power of the female experience with an amazing line-up of live performances created and performed by women:

Mouthpiece  | Jan 31 – Feb 5  | Tickets from $20!

MouthpieceMouthpiece follows one woman, for one day, as she tries to find her voice. The push and the pull, the past and the present, the progress and the regression: this is the inner conflict that exists within a modern woman’s head. Interweaving a cappella harmony, text, and movement – Mouthpiece is a harrowing, humourous, and heart-wrenching journey into the female psyche.

THE DRAW: After a critically acclaimed, sold-out Toronto run, six Dora nominations and two wins, Mouthpiece comes to The Cultch as part of a national tour.

BUY TICKETS 

Girl Positive Book Launch & Panel |  Feb 9  | Free event! 

Join us for the Vancouver launch of the groundbreaking book, Girl Positive, and a panel discussion on Women in the Arts.

Co-authors Fraser and Hagel will facilitate a panel discussion that will uncover the innovative ways in which women artists are disrupting and innovating culture. Featuring prominent women in the arts including author, actor, and playwright Carmen Aguirre, this discussion will provoke and inspire through an exploration of hidden power and wild possibility!

ABOUT THE BOOK
Showcasing diverse voices of girls and young women from North America, Tatiana Fraser and Caia Hagel shift the focus from media’s sensationalist stories to highlight real-life accounts of how girls are making positive change and shaping a new world. Girl Positive offers stories of struggle and victory, and brings to light where today’s girls are finding new paths to empowerment.

RSVP HERE

NeoIndigenA | Feb 15 – 19  | Tickets from $20!

A full-length solo performance from award-winning artistic director, choreographer, and performer Santee Smith (TransMigration), exploring our relationship to ancestors, the living universe, and renewal. The spellbinding score features elemental voices of Inuit singers Tanya Tagaq and Nelson Tagoona with musical composition by Cris Derksen, Jesse Zubot, Michael Red, and Adrian Harjo.

THE DRAW: “[Smith’s] highly charged, traditional/ contemporary/ballet fusion eats up the stage” — The Globe and Mail

BUY TICKETS

am a  |  Feb 21 – Mar 4  |  All tickets just $25!

am a explores identity through the lens of neuroplasticity, a science that examines the brain’s capacity for change. But how do we change our brains? And if we can change, how far can we go? Using personal text, scientific writings, dance, song, and frivolity to explore personal confrontation, am a is a celebration of being human. Of daring to succeed. Of daring to fail.

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