Children of God is getting all the BUZZ!

Children of God is getting all the BUZZ! – Must close March 10!

Corey Payette’s powerful musical, from Urban Ink, about the impact of Canadian residential schools has now been witnessed by over 35,000 people on stages across the country. People can not stop raving about this play; over and over we hear, ‘must-see’, ‘essential’, and ‘vital’, being used to describe it. Check out some of the latest reviews:

Photo by Emily Cooper Photography

“Children of God truly is a must-see for all Canadians, as a lesson about the true history of our country.” —VANCOUVER PRESENTS

“A triumph of dramatic ceremony.” —BROKEN LEG REVIEWS

“Powerful, exciting and emotional.” —TWO CENTS & TWO PENCE

“If you haven’t seen Children of God yet, you should go. Yes, partly because every Canadian needs to understand the legacy of residential schools, but also because it’s an excellent script performed by top-notch double-threat actor/singers and, even when the subject matter gets dark, it’s a real treat to see them perform”—ILIVEINEASTVAN

“One of the most vital and powerful new works in Canadian musical theatre.” —MONTREAL THEATRE HUB

Social media has been lighting up with amazing personal reflections and recommendations:

“An outstanding, transformative production.” —Robert Clifton, facebook comment

“Such a powerful and absolutely moving production. A true must see!” —Joy Clifton, facebook comment

“Very powerful and effective. Bring your tissues and stay for the discussion.” —Leanne Roy, facebook comment

“A show that all Canadians should see! It is brilliant!” —Jamie Johnston, facebook comment


Children of God runs until March 10, 2019, at the York Theatre. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

A look at Canada’s residential schools

Children of God is back in the York Theatre (until March 10, 2019) after a national tour, and its highly successful 2017 world premiere at The Cultch.

Children of God a new musical written and directed by Corey Payette, Production Design by Marshall McMahen, Lighting Design by Jeff Harrison, actors David Keeley, Sarah Carlé, Michelle Bardach, Kaitlyn Yott, Cheyenne Scott, Dillan Chiblow, Aaron M. Wells, Jacob MacInnis, and Michelle St. John. An Urban Ink co-production with Segal Centre (Montreal). Photo by Emily Cooper Photography.

In this powerful musical, by Corey Payette, the children of an Oji-Cree family are sent to a residential school in Northern Ontario. This is a story of redemption: for a mother who was never let past the school’s gate, and her kids, who never knew she came. Children of God offers a thrilling blend of ancient traditions and contemporary realities, celebrating resilience and the power of the Indigenous cultural spirit.

The history of residential schools in Canada is a dark part of this country’s history. This selection from the Children of God study guide is a good starting place for those wanting to inform themselves about Canada’s past and present.

Residential Schools In Canada (Background)

The residential school system in Canada was designed to steal Aboriginal children from their home communities and forcibly turn them into Euro-Christian citizens of Canadian society. As former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s famous epithet from his 2008 apology to residential school survivors goes, the residential schools were meant “to kill the Indian in the child.”

Set up by the federal government, and primarily run by the church, the residential schools sprawled across the nation throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. The last one did not close until 1996.

The system was rooted in the idea that European civilization was superior to the diverse civilizations of the Indigenous peoples, and that it was thus Canada’s moral, and God-given, responsibility to save Aboriginal children from themselves. By isolating the children from their lands, their languages, their relations, and their traditions; and simultaneously immersing them in European customs, primarily rigid gender roles, Anglo-monolingualism, and industrial vocational training, it was thought that Aboriginal communities would die out, and that a unified Canadian nation would emerge.

Archival photo

Residential schools, at their core, were built to commit what is called ‘cultural genocide’. These schools often became places where children would do menial tasks designed to keep the schools open at low cost, rather than as sites of meaningful education. It is also widely reported that these schools were sites of brutal physical, emotional, and sexual abuse against the children, often as punishment for speaking their traditional language, or trying to escape. Many children died while at these schools.

Residential Schools—Lasting Effects

As Children of God will explore, the horrible legacy of the residential school system is still felt today by many Indigenous peoples.

Many of the youth who attended residential schools not only grew up learning to hate their culture, but also grew up not learning how to raise a family, often in an atmosphere of physical and sexual abuse. This has had disastrous impacts for Indigenous communities. For many, survivors of the schools grew into adulthood lacking parenting skills, fostering another generation of children without a nurturing family environment. In many communities today, rates of domestic abuse, alcoholism, and youth suicide are high, many cases of which observers have traced back to the residential school system and the lack of self-esteem it instilled in the students. This ongoing process of undermining community well-being and cohesion, despite the schools being closed, is often referred to as intergenerational trauma.

Healing from Residential Schools

While understanding the vile history of residential schools and the lingering ramifications of this system, it is also important to pause and recognize that this trauma does not define Indigenous peoples and their communities. Many First Nations communities today are healthy and thriving, have a strong connection to their lands and traditions, and are raising younger generations that are eager and ready to continue this process.

On a national scale, it is becoming more common to talk about the residential schools in an honest way for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples alike—partly in thanks to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (see below)—which sought to offer space and a platform for survivors of the schools to talk about their experiences as a means of mending relations between Canada and Indigenous nations. Reconciliation politics is by no means perfect, as many First Nations are waiting for the federal government to deliver on its promise of better futures, but we now have valuable entry points into necessary conversations around what healing can look like.

Many communities that still experience the lingering impact of residential schools are taking matters into their own hands, and are looking to break cycles of intergenerational trauma through their own community-led initiatives, such as education, residential school survivor-oriented societies, and drug and alcohol intervention programs (see below).

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission Findings http://nctr.ca/reports.phph

Resources on Healing and Healing Initiatives

“Healing the Legacy of the Residential Schools.” Where Are The Children http://wherearethechildren.ca/

Aboriginal Healing Foundation http://www.ahf.ca/

The Indian Residential School Survivors Society – http://www.irsss.ca/

Legacy of Hope http://legacyofhope.ca/

For more information about Children of God, and more resources, read the full study guide here.


Children of God runs until March 10, 2019, at the York Theatre. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

A Cultch love letter

A Cultch love letter

This Valentine’s Day, our staff share their Cultch love stories — how they fell for The Cultch and what gets them out of bed in the morning! Have a love story of your own to share? Let us know!

Members of The Cultch staff with cast and crew from Mrs Krishnan’s Party

Lee Newman, Volunteer Coordinator

I first became interested in the Cultch through online research. I was looking into arts organizations to get involved with. I liked that the ED and Director in the organization were women (a rare treasure even in non-profits and the arts), and I thought the programming looked amazing! Diverse and progressive. I met with Cindy to chat about working in the arts and ended up volunteering…and eventually working here!

The moment that came to mind for when I first “fell” for The Cultch was when my partner attended a Founders’ Lounge music and reading event and me. Ivan Coyote did a reading, accompanied by Veda Hille’s music. I loved the cozy, red, cool vibes of the Founders’ Lounge and I LOVED Ivan Coyote – so hilarious and honest. The music was fun and entertaining and lyrically very local! This made it a very special night for me. With representation of queer folks and musicians, I felt safe here. I thought – this place does what I want to do. Inclusivity is a word that comes to mind as very important here and I am all about that.

Lisa Mennell, Communications Associate

I love The Cultch because…

The Cultch has been a place for me to grow and learn, a place to challenge myself, and a place to belong.

I remember the moment I fell for the Cultch. I had just started at The Cultch as an intern. I was completely overwhelmed—new to the city, new to the industry, new to the theatre scene. I felt out of place and over my head.

I think it was day two. I was familiarizing myself with the upcoming Cultch season and going through the material we had for the shows, and we had a copy of the script for Motherload (created by the amazing Emelia Symington Fedy, Jody-Kay Marklew, Juno Rinaldi,and Sonja Bennett). The script was beautiful; poignant, hilarious…it made me want to call my Mom (I did). I laughed, I cried (it was better than Cats!). I think I will always remember that as the moment I decided this was going to be a good place for me. It is the work that we do, and the people we work with, that constantly inspire me and keep me getting out of bed in the morning. And over the past 2.5 years I have slowly made a place for myself in this incredible company—with an unbelievable group of people that constantly remind me of the human capacity for connection and creativity.

I love you Cultch!

Andrew McCaw, Production Manager

I had been working here a little less than a year when I went to see A Vancouver Guldasta in October. I really enjoyed the show. I felt proud of us for programming a piece that represented the Sikh Community so well. At the talkback, the conversation turned to how the women of colour were portrayed in the piece. The comments were very supportive of the work. The Director, Paneet, then said something to the effect of: “If you liked this, you should see Kamloopa! (The OTHER show being presented that week against Guldasta at the Cultch) In fact, THEY close this week, so tell your friends to see Kamloopa THIS week, and come to Guldasta next week!”

We hadn’t asked Paneet to promote the show, it just came to his mind as another example of a show that was created by people of color that actually REPRESENTED them on a modern Canadian stage.

I thought that night: I love working here!

Yuri Arajs, Gallery Coordinator

I love The Cultch because it is making real progress in making our venues more inclusive and accessible to all people.

Cindy Reid, Managing Director

Why do I love The Cultch? I don’t know. But I do.

Is it the people? The staff, the patrons, the volunteers, the sponsors, the donors, the cleaners? I do love all the people.

Is it the programming? Definitely.

Is it the youth program and Ignite? YEP!

Is it the place, the space? Most definitely. It’s awesome! Even the small York lobby – so sweet.

Is it the culture? Ahhh, yes. We care deeply about what we do and who we do it with. It makes going to work a meaningful experience.

It’s a feeling. The Cultch, where we live, work and play on unceded territory. We should write a song about it!

A conversation with Much Ado About Nothing Director, Rebecca Patterson

A conversation with Much Ado About Nothing Director, Rebecca Patterson

Previously from New York City, Rebecca Patterson is known for her inventive classical productions featuring all-female casts for The Queen’s Company (NYC) and her advocacy for diversity and gender-blind casting. As Classic Chic Productions prepares to open Much Ado About Nothing this week, we caught up with Rebecca to chat about her work and inspirations.

Tell us a little bit about yourself.
Born in California and raised in Western Canada, I went to Studio 58 as an actor before beginning my ongoing journey as an auteur theatre director. For the past 20 years I have been happily living and making theatre in New York City, I moved back home to Vancouver just over a year ago and am now making theatre here in addition to my work in NYC.

Can you tell us more about your work at The Queen’s Company in NYC?
Founded in 2000, The Queen’s Company is a NYC-based theatre company dedicated to the creation of inventive productions of classical plays featuring all-female casts. My work with the company weds a love of language to a love of life, weaving inspiration from history and world cultures into the fabric of each production, and is known for its exquisite use of language, bold physicality, creative storytelling and artistic playfulness. I have also been a vocal advocate for culture change in casting practices, calling for greater opportunities for classically trained professional female actors through all-female productions and gender-blind casting.

Why is gender-blind casting important?
Because it’s about humanity. It is a true reflection of our current culture where the old divisions between men and women are falling away. It is also about social justice and equal employment opportunity for female actors.

What inspires your work?
Life, and the actors I have the pleasure and privilege to work with.

What makes you most excited about being back in Vancouver?
Vancouver has become the city I went in search of, diverse, engaged, hopeful, curious. The city and the theatre community excites me, though I love the dynamic energy and drive of NYC, I miss my culture and my people, it is wonderful being back and diving into this new experiment.

What does it mean to you to be part of the Femme Series?
It means I am claiming space onstage for women and encouraging other women to do the same. This is important, we need to have our diverse voices heard and seen. It will be the journey of multiple lifetimes to undo the untold generations of female silence, to arrive at a time where equality of expression is the norm, this is why, even as women achieve more overt equality, programs like the Femme Series remain important and relevant.

What should audiences expect from Classic Chic’s Much Ado About Nothing?
Expect to be surprised.

Tell us about a woman who has inspired you.
So many to choose from! Of all the fierce females who make my day, I have to choose the French female director Ariane Mnouchkine, within the artistry of stage direction she is considered one the best, her relentless pursuit of truth and bold theatricality has been deeply inspirational and fueled my passion to create theatre.

Photo by Emily Cooper

Much Ado About Nothing runs Feb 5 to 16 at the Historic Theatre (1895 Venables Street). Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Karaoke favourites from the Cultch staff!

In preparations for Feminist Karaoke, Cultch staff dish about their karaoke favourites!

Julia Croft wants you to sing along!

Power Ballad, from New Zealand’s Julia Croft and Nisha Madhan (Jan 22-26), is part performance piece, part feminist rant, AND part karaoke party! On Friday, Jan 25, the party will continue after the show, when Julia invites Cultch patrons to join her for Feminist Karaoke — a completely free Femme Series event!

The buzz in the Cultch office is palpable—we are a karaoke loving bunch! Here are a few karaoke favourites—and a couple karaoke memories—from some of the staff, to help you get in the mood for Jan 25.

Chelsea Isenor, Marketing Manager

Favourite Karaoke Song: Total Eclipse of the Heart. I don’t really have the vocal chops to sing it well, but it is so fun to belt out. It’s even better if you have a duet partner, but I have been know to sing both parts!

Kelly Barker, Artistic Associate

Karaoke Memory: I sang “I Love Rock and Roll”, by Joan Jett, at my sister-in-law’s wedding, and it was so terrible that the host of the wedding (it was at a small inn in the Okanagan) told me, the next morning, that it was, “the worst thing he’d ever heard”. My mother-in-law apparently has it on video—and I’ve refused to watch it.

Louise Chapman, Development Associate

Karaoke Memory: It’s not a particularly interesting story, but it’s my only personal karaoke experience!

I do not have a good singing voice, so I have only done karaoke once in my life! I was 19 and travelling in Japan with my friend Mariesha. We went along to a karaoke place and got a little room with some people from out hostel. I drank a lot of plum wine (delicious!) and sang Umbrella by Rihanna. A good memory.

Another time, I was staying in a village on a tiny island in the Philippines, where the local fishermen would gather at night to drink rum and sing karaoke. Their singing filled the tropical night air.

Leslie Dos Remedios, Sales Associate

Favourite Karaoke Song: I actually have a running list of karaoke songs on my phone – like when I’m in a store and hear a song I love, I put it in my phone just so I’m not at a loss in those times I’m flipping through a karaoke binder, not at my full capacity and about to make a questionable adult decision.

Some of my faves to sing are:

I Love Rock and Roll by Joan Jett and The Blackhearts
Wannabe by The Spice Girls
Since You’ve Been Gone by Kelly Clarkson

Very eclectic, I know, but such good guilty pleasures!

We wanna know your karaoke favourites—come sing with us!! Feminist Karaoke with Julia Croft is a FREE Femme Series event on January 25, 2019, at 9PM.


Power Ballad runs until Jan 26 at the Historic Theatre. Book tickets online or call The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

The Femme Series is generously supported by the Charlotte and Sonya Wall Arts Fund.

Power Ballad Creator’s Notes

A Note from Julia Croft | Power Ballad Creator/Performer

Power Ballad is a living, breathing, and demonic little show that we are absolutely delighted to be presenting in Canada for the first time.

This work is the second in a trilogy of feminist works that we created. Power Ballad was inspired in part by the misogynistic train wreck that was the 2016 US election and the implicit gendered narratives that were played out in the politics and media of that time and continue to ripple through our lives and our culture. It was also inspired by a lifetime of personally feeling the ways in which language was used against me as a woman and the ways I felt (and still feel) that language can be an impossible bind.

Over the course of making the show, the concept of language began to also stand in for all those other seemingly immovable patriarchal structures we are all trying to live within or against. They seem permanent but they aren’t – things could be different. While making this work I thought often of the famous Ursula Le Guin quote “We live in capitalism. Its power seems inescapable. So did the divine right of kings. Any human power can be resisted and changed by human beings.” This work is about finding the cracks where resistance can begin.

This show started to become a small rally cry – or at least my own attempt to begin to understand what a resistance could look like and my reminding myself of the importance of being hopeful.

Then as we began rehearsals for the show millions of women around the world marched collectively as part of the Womens’ March. And then we had #metoo. And Hannah Gadsby’s Nanette. And a million other acts of resistance both big and small seem to be appearing every day. And I feel in my gut that things are shifting. Maybe the revolution has already started.

Either way, it is my great joy to be in a room with you all while we sing our hearts out.

Julia x


Power Ballad runs Jan 20-26, at the Historic Theatre. Book tickets online or call The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

It’s party time—time for good music, good laughs…and great food!

It’s party time—time for good music, good laughs…and great food!

Photo by Ankita Singh

The holidays may be over, but the party is only getting started! Coming Jan 15-Feb 3 to the Vancity Culture Lab, Mrs. Krishnan’s Party is a play that takes place at Onam. Have you heard of Onam? It’s a Hindu harvest festival, and it could be the craziest party of them all! Onam celebrates the annual return of the beloved King Maveli to his people. King Maveli was defeated and pushed into the underworld by the gods, but because he was so beloved, he was granted the wish to return to his people once a year. The celebrations for Onam can last up to ten days!

Every great celebration needs great food, and Onam is no different! In fact Onam is know for its good eats—and there are a lot of them:

An example of an Onam Sadhya

All together there are 11 essential dishes which have to prepared…[The]Traditional Onam Sadya (feast) meal comprises of different varieties of curries, upperies – things fried in oil, pappadams which are round crisp flour paste cakes of peculiar make, uppilittathu – pickles of various kinds, chammanthi – the chutney, payasams and prathamans or puddings of various descriptions. Fruits and digestives are also part of the meal. The food has to be served on a tender Banana leaf, laid with the end to the left. The meal is traditionally served on a mat laid on the floor. A strict order of serving the dishes one after the another is obeyed. Besides, there are clear directions as to what will be served in which part of the banana leaf. – www.onamfestival.org 

In Mrs. Krishnan’s Party, Mrs Krishnan is surprised to find that, unbeknownst to her, her boarder, James, has filled her stock room with 100 guests expecting an Onam party (the audience members are the guests!). She is forced to throw an Onam party on the fly. And my oh my, what a party it will be!

And, because every good party needs food, food there must be. Mrs. Krishnan saves the day and makes a delicious daal for everyone to enjoy—yum! We just know you are going to want to know the recipe for this feast.

Here is the recipe for Mrs Krishnan’s Pepper Dhal, as prepared in the play:

RECIPE

(Serves 10)
500g pink lentils
1 litre of boiling water
3 chopped tomatoes or half a tin
2 Tbs of rice bran oil
1 small onion chopped
2 gloves of garlic
1 dried red chilli
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp garam masala
2 tsp salt (or to taste)
1 tsp white pepper

Put lentils, tomatoes and bruised whole cloves of garlic into a large pot of boiling water and simmer till lentils are soft (15-20mins).

Stir occasionally to stop from burning. 5 minutes before lentils are ready, heat oil in a frying pan and add onions and sauté till translucent.

Add all the spices except white pepper and salt to the onions and stir for a minute.Tip the onion spice mixture into the pot of lentils and simmer for five minutes.

Add salt and white pepper. For added deliciousness, add a dash of white vinegar and a big knob of butter right at the end and sprinkle with chopped fresh coriander.  Yum!


Mrs. Krishnan’s Party runs Jan 15-Feb 3, at the Vancity Culture Lab. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363

Feminist Holiday Gift Guide!

Feminist Holiday Gift Guide!

Struggling with your holiday shopping? Need a little help getting the perfect gift for that kick-ass feminist on your list? Look no furtherour Femme Series is coming up this winter, and there are so many amazing shows and events to choose from!

For the Karaoke Loving Feminist in your life…who wants a moment in the spotlight:

Do you have anyone on your list who could use a good evening of belting out classic power ballads? Have we got the show for you!

Power Ballad is an angry, feminist, live art investigation of language and its sometimes hidden ideologies that is part performance lecture and part karaoke party. With an ‘80s soundtrack to rival any school disco, Power Ballad is anarchic and loud; filled with feminist rage and…Annie Lennox.

And, as a BONUSgrab tickets to the performance on January 25, and you can stay behind after the show for a fun evening of Feminist Karaoke with Power Ballad performer Julia Croft!

For the Shakespeare Loving Feminist in your life:

Hipster Shakespeare!

Sure he’s an old, dead, white guy, but the Bard still has some interesting things to say, and in the hands of Classic Chic Theatre Company, this February’s performance of Much Ado About Nothing won’t be your status-quo, Shakespeare!

Shakespeare loving feminists will not want to miss an all-female cast as they take on one of the most famous stage comedies in the worlda deadly serious and sublimely ridiculous story—of soldiers in love and women confined by tradition. It’s a bold and playful romp through the extremes of desire and ambition, loyalty, and redemption.

“It has been my experience that gender-blind casting speaks to a diverse audience—straight and queer, men and women—and is a true reflection of our complex contemporary community.” — Rebecca Patterson, Much Ado about Nothing Director

For the Music Loving Feminist in your life:

There are so many things to choose from for the music loving feminist on your list. From indie, to hula, to punk…and don’t forget the rock ballads, and karaoke! We have the music lover in your life covered!

Don’t miss Ukraine’s Dakh Daughters in their cross-discipline performance from Jan 15-19, at the York Theatre. Seven actresses take musical instruments into their hands in order to create a life-affirming performance about love, freedom, and beauty which at the end of the day—will save the world. Get your tickets for this one fast, because it will sell out!

On January 12, 2019, at the York Theatre, Soft Cedar Presents: Only a Visitor’s Technicolour Education album release, with special guest Wallgrin. Only A Visitor is a quintet that blurs genre boundaries by straddling the line between art music and pop. Their new album, Technicolour Education, focuses on the Chinese diasporic experience in Vancouver through generations of immigrant stories. Tickets are only $20 and can be purchased here.

Soft Cedar will be back at the end of January as well! On January 27, Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole will take the stage in a co-presentation with Capilano University as part of the CapU Global Roots Series. Kaumakaiwa brings to the stage an immense talent as a singer, chanter, and dancer as well as a deep understanding of her Hawaiian culture and her place as a modern, transgender (mahu wahine) Hawaiian in this contemporary world. She engages Indigenous thought to address today’s issues through music, chant, and sharing of spirit.

And, of course, who can forget about Power Ballad?!

For the aspiring Feminist Playwright in your life:

Do you have that one friend who always tells you their “brilliant” play ideas? Theatre creators and producers Kim Senklip Harvey and Pippa Mackie host Pitch, Bitch, or Ditch on Jan 14—an unforgettable night that puts the power in the hands of the patrons! From anonymous suggestions made by the audience, Kim and Pippa will lead patrons through a lively evening of banter and debate—no idea is off limits, no suggestions taboo or too dangerous. The bar will be open. There will be guest appearances…and loads of surprises! And with tickets for only $10, this makes the perfect stocking stuffer, or secret Santa gift!

AND THAT IS NOT EVEN ALL!
Full list of events for the Femme Series:

Jan 11: WROL (Without Rule of Law) by Michaela Jeffery—A new play reading presented by Touchstone Theatre, 8PM, Historic Theatre—FREE
Jan 12: Soft Cedar Presents: Only a Visitor album release, with special guest Wallgrin, 8PM, Historic Theatre—$20
Jan 14: Women in the Arts Mixer, 6-8PM, Historic Theatre—FREE
Jan 14: Pitch, Bitch, or Ditch, with Pippa Mackie and Kim Harvey8-9PM, Historic Theatre—$10
Jan 15 – 19: Dakh Daughters (Ukraine), York Theatre—Main Stage Season Production
Jan 22 – 26: Power Ballad, Julia Croft/Nisha Madhan (New Zealand), 8PM, Historic Theatre—Main Stage Season Production
Jan 25: Feminist Karaoke with Julia Croft, after Power Ballad, 9PM, Historic Theatre—FREE
Jan 27: Soft Cedar Presents: Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole, presented as part of CapU Global Roots Series, 8PM, York Theatre—$40
Feb 5 – 16: Much Ado About Nothing, Classic Chic Productions (Vancouver), Historic Theatre—Main Stage Season Production


Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Music Monday: The Songs of East Van Panto

Music Monday: The Songs of East Van Panto

Check out all the songs given an East Van spin in this year’s East Van Panto: Wizard of Oz. Musical Director, and composer, Veda Hille is infamous for taking some of the most (and least) popular songs of recent decades and flipping them on their heads with new arrangements and lyrics to add a little pizzazz to Theatre Replacement’s winter tradition. Take a listen to the original songs that have inspired the music of this year’s Panto soundtrack, then come hear our versions at the York Theatre! Scroll through this awesome list of golden age videos and live performances, or check out this Spotify playlist if you’re on the go!

Gloria by Laura Branigan

Valerie by Steve Winwood

This is America by Childish Gambino

Walking on Sunshine by Katrina and The Waves

Downtown by Petula Clark

Somewhere Over The Rainbow by Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg

Northwest Passage by Stan Rogers

Immigrant Song by Led Zeppelin

All Night by Big Boi

Ding Dong The Witch is Dead by Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg

Macarena by Los del Rio

In My Feelings by Drake

Swish Swish by Katy Perry

Footloose by Kenny Loggins

Daydream Believer by The Monkees

ABC by The Jackson 5

I Want You Back by The Jackson 5

Teen Titans Go To The Movies by Lil Yachty

Ballroom Blitz by Sweet

Sweet Transvestite by Richard O’Brien

Time Warp by Richard O’Brien

East Van Panto: Wizard of Oz is onstage now at the York Theatre, 639 Commercial Drive – must close Jan 6, 2019! Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Ghosts of Scrooges past!

Ghosts of Scrooges Past!

The story of A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens, is one of the best known and best loved Christmas stories. This beloved tale of redemption has been told and retold in many forms, from traditional tellings, to those that are down right brazen.

Esmé Massengill

Ronnie Burkett’s Little Dickens, which opened this week in the Historic Theatre falls firmly in the brazen category, with beloved Daisy Theatre character—the booze loving, faded and jaded Diva—Esmé Massengill, taking on the role of legendary miser, Scrooge.

In this role, so perfectly suited to her, Esmé Massengill joins the ranks of so many other celebrities who have taken on the challenge of playing Dickens’ Ebeneezer Scrooge (we think she does it best!).

Here is a look at a few other famous faces that have taken on this legendary role. Esmé is in good company!


Little Dickens runs Dec 4 – 22, 2018 at the Historic Theatre, 1895 Venables Street. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.