DONOR SPOTLIGHT: Kath Bourchier

DONOR SPOTLIGHT:  A conversation with Kath Bourchier

Kath Bourchier with Alberta’s sweetheart, Mrs Edna Rural!

Kath, you have been involved with The Cultch in many different ways. Can you tell us what first attracted you to the organization?

I first became involved with The Cultch when I managed provincial sponsorships for Alcan Aluminium Limited (now Rio Tinto). Heather Redfern’s predecessor Duncan Low visited me to discuss whether we could find some mutually-beneficial basis for a partnership. In 1996, we developed the $60,000 Alcan Performing Arts Award to be granted annually to a B.C. performing arts company for the development of new work. I am very proud that this award lasted for 14 years, funding many of the B.C. companies that have gone on to win international acclaim. When I left Alcan in 2001, after 26 years, and was no longer in a conflict-of-interest position, Duncan recruited me to The Cultch Board of Directors, which I served for 15 years. I was Board Chair when we broke ground on our incredible renovations. And, as Chair, I hired Heather, perhaps my proudest accomplishment of all.

Reoccurring gifts are important for the sustainability of The Cultch. Why did you choose to become a monthly donor?

I became a monthly donor when I was elected Board Chair, primarily to set an example for other Board members.  We have never required Board members to be donors but I’ve always believed that, as Directors of not-for-profit organizations, we’re on more solid ground to solicit donations from others if we’re financially invested ourselves. My monthly donations come out of my bank account automatically. I budget for them, and this is the most painless way I know to watch affordable donations add up to significant contributions. I have also learned, over the years, how important monthly donations are to The Cultch as a consistent and reliable source of revenue. It’s not the amount of one’s monthly donation that is important; it’s the accumulative value over time. For me, it’s immensely satisfying to contribute an amount I can afford on a monthly basis to an organization to which I am deeply committed because it enriches our lives. Try it … I guarantee you’ll like it!

You have several years’ experience working in strategic communications; can you tell us how this skill set intersects with your involvement at The Cultch?

Once in a rare while, I provide some advice that seems to help (or so they’re kind enough to tell me). But we have such a bright, young staff that do such a good job of looking after our donors, our patrons, and the marketing challenges that I think they’re just indulging me.

Can you tell us what you wish other people knew about The Cultch?

Easily. I wish they knew the lovely sense of community available to them. Challenging shows, good friends, wonderful conversations. And the loveliest sense of commitment to something bigger than ourselves.

What are you curious about right now?

I am always curious about what Heather will identify next. She is an extraordinary programmer who brings to Vancouver audiences things we need to see and hear and experience.


As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today! Contact Natalie Schneck, Development Associate: natalie@thecultch.com; 604.251.1766 x.121
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001

A Q&A with Kevin McKendrick and Lindsey Angell about BUTCHER

A Q&A with Kevin McKendrick and Lindsey Angell about BUTCHER

Butcher, an edge-of-your-seat thriller from award-winning Canadian playwright, Nicolas Billon, opens March 21 at the Historic Theatre, and runs until March 31.

Early Christmas morning, on the doorsteps of a Toronto police station, Inspector Lamb discovers an unlikely bundle; a drugged and abandoned old man, who doesn’t speak any English, dressed in a strange military uniform. Atop his head a Santa hat, and around his neck a business card impaled on a butchers hook with the words, “Arrest me,” scrawled on it. Inspector Lamb begins an investigation into the identity of the stranger that will forever tie together the lives of four people: a lawyer, a translator, the stranger and the inspector.

 

We connected with Director, Kevin Mckendrick, and performer, Lindsey Angell, to ask them a few questions about bringing the hit show to The Cultch stage.

What excites you most about bringing Butcher to The Cultch stage?

Lindsey — Butcher has managed to get under my skin and I think it will truly draw our audiences in as well. It is deceptive and sneaky and even oddly charming at times, but be careful, you might get *hooked*…hehehe.

The Cultch has partnered with Amnesty International as a Community Partner for Butcher. Our Community Partners offer us the opportunity to spread the word about important issues at the same time as helping us spread the word about our shows. Knowing what you do about Amnesty International, do you feel that it is a good fit? Why?

Kevin — I think it’s an excellent partnership because Amnesty International wrestles with the issues in Butcher every single day. In her forward to the play Louise Arbour, a former Supreme Court of Canada justice, and former Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda said, “When can victims find peace when justice is elusive?” and  “Can offenders find closure if punishment is not extended to them?” Are these not huge questions for our time? Real peace and closure, it is often said, can only come from forgiveness. It falls to organizations like A.I to help us find our way through these tangled questions.

Why do you think Butcher has hit such a chord across Canada since its debut?

Lindsey — Butcher is brave. It does not choose sides or lead its audience in any way. That kind of experience in live theatre is rare and exhilarating.

In an ideal world, what would you like audiences to take away with them after seeing Butcher?

Kevin — One of my mentors, the playwright  John Murrell, impressed upon me the idea that theatre must be provocative, yet entertaining. It’s a maxim I try to apply to every play I work on. I want audiences leaving Butcher at The Cultch to feel we exceeded their expectations. I want them to be  thrilled and moved by the experience. To be glad they left the comfort of their home to take in a play. And I want them to leave the theatre arguing about the themes of justice and revenge. The best theatre serves to help us strengthen our society by spurring us to make changes.

You have put together an all-star cast of performers and creators for this production. Lindsey, what do you think Butcher offers actors that other plays may not?

Lindsey — Butcher is unlike any show I have done before. I have spoken in dialects and even other languages but never have I been given the gift of learning an invented language (playwright, Nicolas Billon, had two linquistics professors from the University of Toronto invent the language of ‘Lavinian’ specifically for this play). This story is incredibly mysterious and the characters are fighting fiercely for what they need, creating a tension I have yet to experience on stage. That’s about all I can say without spilling any spoilers.

Butcher has some very serious themes — justice, revenge, forgiveness — Have there been many discussions during rehearsals? Do you think it will stir up debate with audiences?

Lindsey — Of course! We have turned this play over and over, hashing out the ideas and the arc of the story. It is our hope that the audience will discuss the piece passionately afterwards, not only the themes but their own personal response to the ride.

Is there anything else about putting on Butcher that you would like to say a few words about?

Kevin — I have been so fortunate to have this opportunity. To work on this fine Canadian play with this outstanding team of collaborators. And it is very gratifying to us to have The Cultch recognize the importance of Nicolas Billon’s play and afford us the opportunity to share it with Vancouver audiences.

Thank you Kevin and Lindsey!

To read more about Butcher check out this great article from the Vancouver Sun, a Q&A with Peter Anderson.


Butcher runs March 20-31 at the Historic Theatre. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.


Written by: Nicolas Billon

Starring: Peter Anderson, Lindsey Angell, Noel Johansen, and Daryl Shuttleworth

Director: Kevin McKendrick

Artistic Associate: Christy Webb, Set Designer: David Roberts, Costume Designer: Jenifer Darbellay, Assistant Costume Designer: Alaia Hamer, Lighting Designer: Michael Hewitt, Original Music and Sound Design: Keith Thomas, Stage Manager: Joanne P.B. Smith, Makeup Consultant: Miss Nikki Ying, Student Apprentice: Leah Read

Official Website: www.butcherplay.com 

DONOR SPOTLIGHT: Jodi Sprackman with the Rosedale on Robson

DONOR SPOTLIGHT: Jodi Sprackman with the Rosedale on Robson

Can you tell us how the Rosedale on Robson first got involved with The Cultch?

Our long-standing partnership with The Cultch began in 2001 when we were approached to discuss accommodating your artists during the theatre season. This is our 17th year as a hotel sponsor, and we still love welcoming The Cultch’s artists to the Rosedale!

What has surprised you and your colleagues most about partnering with The Cultch?

The great relationships we’ve forged with many of the people who work at The Cultch.

Over the years there have been several artists who have made the Rosedale on Robson their home while touring shows to The Cultch.  Are there any highlights or memorable moments from meeting the artists?

Meeting Miriam Margolyes when she stayed with us in 2012 while performing in a one-woman show entitled Dickens Women. She is an award-winning actress and a long-time veteran of film, television and theatre. She was funny, outspoken and gracious (we chatted a few times during her stay), and made such an impression on us that we even changed our pool hours to accommodate her schedule (and we haven’t changed them back since!).

Jodi, can you tell us a bit more about what you do in your role as the Director of Community Relations?

I am responsible for all things community-related, with a primary focus on sponsorship agreements with various performing arts organizations. Accommodations are a big part of their budgetary requirements, and because we have the means to help out in this area, we do.

Because we’re an all-suite hotel that also happens to be located in the heart of the entertainment district, artists really enjoy staying with us. It’s an easy walk to a variety of theatres (and not too far a drive from The Cultch), and they love the convenience of having their own kitchen, especially after getting “home” after a late performance.  Working with theatre companies and festivals is a natural partnership that has flourished over the years.

How important do you think it is that the arts organizations continue to cultivate and sustain partnerships with corporate sponsors?

I think it’s crucial to create and foster these partnerships. The very nature of sponsorships focuses on building relationships where different organizations can help support one another. The reason we primarily focus on these organizations is because the arts are notoriously underfunded and are always in need of assistance from the community. The arts tend to be overlooked, and cultural events are often forced to be put on the back burner, having to be either scaled back or cancelled.

We believe that the arts are an integral part of our community as a whole, and partnering with various organizations helps foster the commitment the Rosedale has to the overall support and promotion of the arts in Vancouver. We’re committed to playing a part in helping to enrich our cultural community.

What are you curious about right now?

People. My kids say I’m nosy, but I’m really just interested (and maybe just a little bit nosy). Everyone has a story. I like learning about people and their lives.


As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today! Contact Natalie Schneck, Development Associate: natalie@thecultch.com; 604.251.1766 x.121
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001

Donor Spotlight: Jamie Evrard

Donor Spotlight with Jamie Evrard

Jamie, you have been long-time supporter of The Cultch.  Can you tell us how you first got involved with the organization?

I’ve been involved with the Cultch since 1978 when I moved to Vancouver and sold my weaving at the Circle Craft Christmas Market which was then held there. I’ve always been intrigued by and attended many of the Cultch’s offerings so when I realized I had enough money to begin giving back to Vancouver in some way the Cultch was an obvious choice.  It is a real community theatre and supports so many smaller local theatre groups as well as international performers. I went to a Peggy Baker show way back and I met a filmmaker/photographer, who asked me if he could photograph my hands for one of his projects. The Cultch is a place where this kind of connection can happen. It’s intimate and you’ll always talk to people.

What has surprised you most about working/partnering with The Cultch?

The fun of getting to know so many of the people who work at and give to the Cultch. Being able to attend special events and actually see works in progress and meet their creators.

You’ve built an admirable and remarkable career as a visual artist both in Canada and internationally. What do you find interesting about supporting the other artistic disciplines such as theatre and dance? 

I believe that a vibrant arts scene is essential for a great city so I’d like to help make Vancouver more exciting. Great theatre adds color to life, that can’t hurt!

Does seeing theatre and dance inform your own artistic work? 

You know I saw Jane Heyman’s version of “Three Sisters” by Chekhov in 2013, and I’m not saying that it informed my work directly, but there was something about that piece. Jane and I often talk about the creative process and one day she saw a painting hanging upside down in my studio and I confessed that I often work this way to be able to better see the shapes and forms I’m creating.  She told me sometime later that she was experimenting with rehearsing her theatre pieces starting at the end.

It’s hard to be an artist of any age, from being a small child to an older person. I think just seeing people making and performing art is inspiring in itself.  I like that you guys do risky work.

Can you tell us what you wish other people knew about The Cultch?

Giving to the Cultch is a great way to feel a part of artistic creation and giving money away is one of the most fun things you can do. Its fun to support artistic creation and it’s easier and more possible to become a donor then a lot of people think. The Cultch is a place you can make a difference, it is small enough so that every donation counts and it’s a cool community of vibrant artists.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about donating to The Cultch but hasn’t made the move yet? 

It is an exciting organization to be inside of.  The Cultch has lots of outreach programs for kids and people who would otherwise  not be able to attend theatre. Also, donor events , like the director’s circle receptions before shows are a lot of fun.

You have got a great aesthetic sensibility in many areas, Jamie (I love your style!) Can you tell us where you look to for inspiration?

I’m inspired by the work of other artists I see when I travel, and the work of local artists including many of those in Bau Xi Gallery. Also by solitary confinement and boredom—my time in Italy where life is simpler.  As Einstein said, “creativity is a residue of time wasted”.   You know last night, I came back from San Francisco and I had to go into the studio – I had to work. The phone rang and I didn’t answer.  Sometimes you gotta be ruthless to be creative.  These days we are offered all this free stuff on social media but really it takes away something of incredible value – our time—so I don’t do any of it.

What are you curious about?

People. I love hearing people’s stories and everybody has a story to tell if you ask which I often do.  Stories well told are universally engaging, and theatre is the best way to tell them.  And the Yucatán! My next trip.

 

 

Jamie Evrard’s Upcoming Exhibition:

Bau-Xi Gallery

March 3-17, 2018
3045 Granville Street, Vancouver

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 3, 2:00 – 4:00pm

 

 

 


As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today! Contact Natalie Schneck, Development Associate: natalie@thecultch.com; 604.251.1766 x.121
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001

Donor Spotlight: Michael Hedden with Dignity Memorial

Donor Spotlight: Michael Hedden with Dignity Memorial

This February, for our Donor Spotlight, Natalie Schneck, our Development Associate connected with Michael Hedden of Dignity Memorial.

Thank you so much for joining us in this edition of The Cultch’s Donor Spotlight, I am delighted to interview you, Michael!

How and when did you first get involved with The Cultch?

Jamie and I attended a performance with our dear friends and former neighbors, Maureen and Bob. We were so impressed and invigorated with the quality of the performance, that we made a conscious decision to see as many of the remaining performances of that season. What a revelation to find this gem in our city. As a patron, I feel as if I belong to something bigger. Sitting in that audience, I become part of this cathartic ebb and flow of the human experience. I believe storytelling in all of its artistic forms is vital to understanding ones journey as an individual, as a family and a community.

Please tell us a little about the work you do with Dignity Memorial:

As a funeral professional, I facilitate and help families tell the story of their loved one who has passed on. I provide a platform upon which a family can build a tribute that incorporates cultural, religious and personal preferences that directly reflect and honour the person who has lived. Through spoken word, music, and imagery we bring people together to express our loss, love and gratitude for the person we are remembering. I currently manage our Ocean View property located in Burnaby.

Michael, was there a turning point when you realized The Cultch is an organization
that fits the altruistic mandate and community mindedness of Dignity
Memorial?

With my reference to storytelling it was an obvious fit right from the start. I am privileged to work for a company that encourages its employees to participate in the community we live and work in. I believe it is imperative that when able, one’s philanthropy benefit a diverse community. Funding for the arts is vital to our wellbeing and contributes to a healthier community.

Recently, Dignity Memorial became an integral part of our Legacy Giving
program – Can you tell us what this means to you and how it aligns with The
Cultch and its future growth?

Legacy Giving is an undeniable way to make sure that your support for The Cultch continues after you are gone. Let us be honest, you cannot take your money with you when you die. As individuals, we have the opportunity to make a meaningful statement that reflects ones commitment to the arts in life and in death.

Do you feel that Dignity Memorial’s partnership with The Cultch is creative? In what ways?

I don’t know that the partnership is creative per say, but I am proud of the fact that through our continued sponsorship and support, Dignity Memorial and The Cultch are able to showcase the Arts, in all of its glory, to our community and makes it accessible to as many people as possible. Together, I would like to think we bring the best of performance art to Vancouver.

Has there been a Cultch show that you just can’t forget?

Oh, that is a tough one; there have been many for sure. Two still resonate with me, Big Mouth in 2016 and La Merde in 2017. So inspiring that I still get goose bumps when I think of them.

Finally, what are you curious about right now?

I continue to be fascinated and curious about the way in which we communicate with each other in today’s world. It comes back to that ebb and flow of the human experience. Acknowledgement, humility, acceptance, forgiveness…I believe we are all part of the story; it is exciting to think about how we influence the outcome.

Thank you!


As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today! Contact Natalie Schneck, Development Associate: natalie@thecultch.com; 604.251.1766 x.121
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001

Behind-the-scenes of Jabberwocky and No Foreigners!

Behind-the-scenes of Jabberwocky and No Foreigners!

It is an exciting week here at The Cultch – we have TWO shows opening! At the York Theatre, Jabberwocky runs Feb 6-17 (Opening Feb 7), and at the Vancity Culture Lab, we have No Foreigners playing Feb 7-17 (Opening Feb 8).

In this exciting blog post we reveal a few behind-the-scenes images for both of these amazing shows – A sneak peek just for you!

Jabberwocky:

Inspired by Lewis Carrol’s famous nonsense poem, Jabberwocky explores the things that keep us awake at night. What will it take to slay our own Jabberwock? Take a look at some of the behind-the-scene images from The Old Trout Puppet Workshop:

For an exciting behind-the-scenes look at Jabberwocky, check out this great video from Vancouver Presents!

No Foreigners:

An interdisciplinary collaboration (co-presented with Theatre Conspiracy) from Hong Kong Exile and fu-GEN Theatre (Toronto), two leading Asian-Canadian performing arts companies, No Foreigners takes a unique look at Chinese malls, through live performance, micro-to macro video, text, miniatures, and media design in this exciting world premiere. Check out these images from their time creating at Carleton University:

Jabberwocky runs at the York Theatre Feb 6-17. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

No Foreigners runs at the Vancity Culture Lab Feb 7-17. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

 

Donor Spotlight: Charlotte and Sonya Wall

Donor Spotlight: Charlotte and Sonya Wall

This month marks our second annual Femme month at The Cultch; both have been generously supported by Charlotte and Sonya Wall. We chatted with Charlotte and Sonya to learn a bit more about their involvement with The Cultch and their passion for supporting female artists.

Thank you so much for joining us in this edition of The Cultch’s Donor Spotlight! You have both been long-time supporters of The Cultch. Can you tell us how you first got involved with the organization?

Sonya: I first became involved with The Cultch through attending theatre productions. I loved the diversity and originality of The Cultch productions and believed that The Cultch offered Vancouverites the opportunity to see theatre which was contemporary, thought provoking and international in its scope. I wanted to support such an endeavour. Around the same time, I also got to know Heather Redfern – who is marvelous – through the restoration of the York Theatre. I asked Heather how Charlotte and I could best help The Cultch and so we came up with the idea of a Femme February or January theme.

What has surprised you most about working/partnering with The Cultch?

Sonya: What has surprised me most about working and partnering with The Cultch is the enthusiasm, dedication and openness of everyone. They are all committed to providing the best experience for the theatre goer and for the actors, writers, directors and technical staff. Everyone works in concert with each other and are super organized – a rarity in any organization! Also, the creative energy at The Cultch is amazing.

Charlotte: I too, admire the dedication and enthusiasm I constantly encounter when I am at The Cultch. I think The Cultch provides an important service in the community in regards to women in theatre and consistently stages contemporary and cutting-edge work.

Charlotte, you are a trained and practicing visual artist. Do you find that engaging with other art forms, such as theatre and dance, contributes to your own artistic practice?

Charlotte: As an artist working also in a contemporary mode, I strongly believe that all art forms influence and benefit each other.The expression of thought and discovery in every form relates to the endeavours of artists in other mediums.

I find the staging involved in both theatre and dance can easily inform some of my work, especially since I often deal with the manipulation of spacial assumptions. The composition of characters in a play on stage or the choreography of dance involves the same process as composing a sculpture or an installation.

I look forward to many more Cultch events and I will always enjoy the open minds that present us with challenging and intriguing visual offerings.

Sonya, you are passionate about supporting women in higher education and the arts. What do find fulfilling about supporting women in these particular areas?

Sonya: I am a strong believer and proponent for supporting and recognizing women in the Arts and all fields. I am not sure if “fulfilling” is the feeling I get from supporting this belief, rather it is a balancing. I can remember in the ’80s taking a modern American literature course and looking at the outline and realizing that we would only be reading one work written by a woman compared to 9 by men. When I queried this imbalance, the Professor stated that he had neither noticed the discrepancy nor did he care. I would like to say that my voluble reaction to his response resulted in a change, but alas, no. While this scenario is probably not as visible today, it is, nevertheless, still necessary to foreground women’s work in all areas as we have still not achieved that optimal balance. One only has to look at the economics of wage parity within today’s society. So, supporting Femme Feb/Jan makes me feel as if I am helping achieve a balance, which, frankly, I am still fairly voluble about.

Can you tell us what wish other people knew about The Cultch?

Sonya: I wish people knew how hard everyone at The Cultch works to continue providing the audience and community with top notch entertainment. Every season brings new, exciting and professional works to the stage. Truly amazing.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about donating to The Cultch but hasn’t made the move yet?

Sonya: Don’t stop at “go,” just give.

One last question, what are you curious about right now?

Sonya: I am curious about the tipping point society has recently reached as women finally feel they can speak out about sexual harassment. I am also interested in seeing how this movement changes the workplace – both the conduct and the demographic. And, I am most curious to see Hot Brown Honey along with many other Cultch productions. Should be fun.

 


As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today!
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001
________________________________________

Rave Reviews for Hot Brown Honey!

Rave Reviews for Hot Brown Honey!

Have you seen Hot Brown Honey yet? Audiences are going wild for this smash-hit from Australia!

Check out some of the amazing things Vancouver reviewers have had to say about it:

“Is it empowering, exuberant, rousing, fun? Hell, yes. It’s also the show that the world needs right now – has needed for some time, but man, the time is ripe for it” — Marsha Lederman, The Globe and Mail

“Part hip hop concert, part pep rally, Hot Brown Honey is a loud, proud evening of consciousness raising; a series of lessons on race and gender that says you can have your revolution and dance to it, too” — Jerry Wasserman, Vancouver Sun

Hot Brown Honey throws a female-powered dance party that’s well worth joining…What a party!” — Kathleen Oliver, The Georgia Straight

“With its mix of burlesque, circus, dance, beatboxing, and hip-hop, on the surface Hot Brown Honey is like a really great variety show. Layered with the politics of gender, race and colonialism though, it becomes so much more” — Mark Robins, Vancouver Presents

Weave Image By Dylan Evans

Hot Brown Honey is more than a show, it is an embodiment of sexual liberation, a celebration of matriarchal ideas and a call to action for a better tomorrow through education and awareness of inherent societal privilege and racial divides. It’s not like anything you have ever seen” — Penny Warwick, Two Cents & Two Pence

Hot Brown Honey is visually mind-blowing with a whole load of talent on stage…There’s singing, dancing, rapping and costumes changes that leave your head swiveling”— Jo Ledingham, joledingham.ca

“Hot Brown Honey is a MUST SEE for EVERYONE… You will leave this show buzzing with energy and ready to rain fire on the patriarchy” — Maddison Miller, The Vancouver Arts Review

“If you enjoy shows that are sassy, sexy and have a social conscious this is definitely for you” — John Jane, Review Vancouver

“It’s raunchy, colourful, mind-boggling and fun” — Entertainment Vancouver

Hot Brown Honey runs at the York Theatre Jan 9-27. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Meet the Honeys!

Meet the Honeys!

Hot Brown Honey opens at the York Theatre January 10. This fierce patriarch-smashing show has been shaking things up on its #WorldPollinationTour, and the buzz is palpable. We couldn’t be more excited to introduce you to the amazing women that will be taking over the York stage for most of January (Jan 9-27).

It’s time to get sticky!

Lisa Fa’alafi by Dylan Evans

LISA FA’ALAFI aka THE GAME CHANGER
(Creator | Writer | Director | Choreographer | Designer)
Definition: Innovator of an event, idea, or procedure that significantly alters in the
current way of doing or thinking. Shake’Em Up Woman. Defies the
Norm. Shifts the Paradigm. Rocks The Boat.

In The Words Of Dr Angela Davis:
‘You have to act as if it were possible to radically transform the world.
And you have to do it all the time.’

Ofa Fotu by Dylan Evans

OFA FOTU aka THE MYTH SLAYER (Soul Woman)
Definition: Defeats a fiction or half-truth, especially one that forms part of an
ideology. She slays. Staff Holder. Soothsayer. Smashes Stereotypes.
Centrestage.

In The Words Of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie:
“The single story creates stereotypes, and the problem with stereotypes is not that
they are untrue, but that they are incomplete.
They make one story become the only story.”

Hope Haami by Dylan Evans

HOPE HAAMI aka HOPE ONE (Beatboxer)
Definition: Advocates a joyful of mindset of positive outcomes for the world at
large via rhythmic beats made with the mouth. Music Maker.
Collaborator. Decolonise and Moisturise.

In The Words Of Maryann Talia Pau:
“We ARE light. We ARE love. And love, is everything.”

Crystal Stacey by Dylan Evans

CRYSTAL STACEY aka THE PEACE MAKER (Hoops & Aerials)
Definition: She who brings about a sense of unity through truth. Poet. Mover.
Embodies the change she wants to see. Future Sculptor. Radical
Fierce Love.

In The Words Of Audre Lorde:
“We’ve been taught that silence would save us, but it won’t.”

Elena Wangurra

ELENA WANGURRA aka THE GROUND BREAKER (Contemporary Dancer)
Definition: Originator or pioneer that leads to/makes possible further growth. Risk
Taker. The Fierce Awakens. Makes Noise.

In The Words Of Dr Lilla Watson:
“If you have come to help me, you are wasting your time. If you have come because
your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

Busty Beatz by Dylan Evans

BUSTY BEATZ aka THE QUEEN BEE
Creator | Writer | Musical Director | Composer | Sound Designer
Definition: So Boss. Vessel for The Word of The Mother. Divine Feminine Power.
Hip Hop Wrath. Filled with joyous rage. Protector of the Hive.
Nurturer. See Matriarchy. Fights The Power.

In The Words Of Busty Beatz:
“Fighting The Power Never Tasted So Sweet.”

— WORD TO THE MOTHER —

The Mother- The Hive- By Dylan Evans

Want a taste of the show? Meet the Honeys up close and personal in this live facebook interview with Vancouver Presents:

Live in the hive with the company of Hot Brown Honey

Hot Brown Honey runs at the York Theatre Jan 9-27. Book tickets online or by phone by calling The Cultch Box Office at 604.251.1363.

Donor Spotlight: Ken Gracie and Philip Waddell

Donor Spotlight: Ken Gracie and Philip Waddell

 

We recently chatted with long-time Cultch supporters Ken Gracie and Philip Waddell to learn more a bit more about why supporting The Cultch has been so important to them for so many years.

Ken and Philip, thank you so much for joining us in this edition of The Cultch’s Donor Spotlight! You have both been long-time subscribers and donors to The Cultch. Can you tell us how you first got involved?

K: This is pretty nostalgic; we are going back to the ’70s now. It was only the old Historic Theatre at that time. This is long before any refurbishment of any note. We have a nephew and niece, now in their late 30’s, who enjoyed the movies on the big screen at The Cultch on Saturday mornings. We loved to attend! The “kids”  still recall it fondly. The Cultch was not an alternate theatre for that sake alone; it had a diversity of offerings, topics, performance method, and originality.

P: I have a fond recollection of my first time at The Cultch. It was the fall of 1976 and the production was Hossana. This type of theatre was totally new to me – it was raw and taboo and left a lifelong memory. Up until that point, my theatre experiences were mostly bland and felt too safe, this left me feeling unsatisfied.

It’s pretty amazing the impact that diverse and edgy programming can have. Phil, I love that your first Cultch experience left a lifelong memory, that’s such a gift!

K: And diversity is consistently relevant and nurtured by The Cultch. The conversations and the awakening that The Cultch offers are ongoing, and our attendance as subscribers is still our biggest theatre commitment.

Any show highlights?

P: Dickens’ Women, Empire of the Son and Children of God

What has surprised you most about working/partnering with The Cultch?   

P: Through our involvement with The Cultch I have had the privilege of getting to know staff, volunteers and fellow patrons who have enriched my life with their knowledge and enthusiasm.

K: And the growth of The Cultch over the years to include the Jim Green House Studio, along with the management and presentations at the York Theatre speak to the strength and major talents in Vancouver’s theatre and arts community. The engagement with staff, opening receptions, talk backs, and performances are always anticipated with excitement. It is very connecting. The Cultch is our family by choice. We also really like our own families.

Speaking of families, I know you are both advocates of strengthening our community and making live performance accessible to everyone. Can you tell us what you wish other people knew about The Cultch?

K: We know that at The Cultch there is inclusiveness of all communities and economic/social backgrounds. Provisions are made to make the live performance experience accessible to those people who might otherwise feel it is beyond their means to attend. Opportunity can be transformational. We all benefit in the experience and it should be shared.

P: Because of the wide variety of topics addressed and expressed, each season at The Cultch provides the stimulation many of us need to take a fresh look at old assumptions.

The Cultch programming really does offer audience members a chance to experience a different perspective that might be out of their comfort zone. 

P:  Yes and because of opportunity for a fresh perspective, I highly encourage more people to include The Cultch and its productions into their year of theatre.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about donating to The Cultch but hasn’t made the move yet?

K: The Cultch offers a high quality Youth Program that focuses on life skills as much as creativity and innovation; community outreach and ticket subsidies are made available through Cultch Connects and The Cultch supports the development of artistic work. These offerings require financial support and commitment from those who enjoy and appreciate The Cultch and can help financially over and above buying a ticket. We view this as a charitable opportunity and investment worthy of consideration based on performance and delivery by The Cultch.

We are so grateful that you and Philip see the incredible value that The Cultch has in our community!

K:   There are now theatre opportunities in the three affiliated venues of different size  – the Historic Theatre, the Culture Lab, and the York Theatre. In the last 40 years The Cultch has had great significance in our lives. We have grown substantially older in our membership. The Cultch continues to keep us renewed and challenged.

And what about our current show, the East Van Panto: Snow White & the Seven Dwarves running at the York? 

K: Who doesn’t love the Panto filled with kids and excitement and fun? LOOK BEHIND YOU!

Right? It’s absolutely heart-warming and inspiring!  Thanks Ken and Philip!
As a registered Canadian charity, The Cultch relies on the support of the community to operate as a cultural hub; bringing diverse and engaging live performance to the stage.
Please consider making a donation today!
Charitable registration # 11928 1574 RR0001